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Lee de-Wit (PI)

 

Lee originally trained as an experimental psychologist / cognitive neuroscientist but now applies psychology to understand political decision making. In addition to directing the Political Psychology Lab, Lee is also the Director of the Psychology and Behavioural Sciences (PBS) BSc program, and is the incoming Director of Studies for PBS at Trinity Hall.

 

 

 Department Biography

 

 

E-mail: lhd26@cam.ac.uk

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Tessa Buchanan (PhD Student)

 

After studying PPE at Oxford, Tessa worked as a journalist (BBC, AFP, Daily Telegraph), before switching to government communications where she held roles including ministerial speechwriter, head of the UK Trade & Investment Press Office and Head of Communications on Europe for the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (2012-2015). She worked on the Scottish referendum, the Olympics, Exporting is GREAT and the EU reform campaign. She left the civil service in 2016 to study for a Masters in Behavioural Science at LSE where she looked at behavioural factors behind the EU referendum result, and is now doing a PhD exploring the psychology of effective communications around immigration. Tessa is supervised by Lee and Alan Renwick (Deputy Director of the Constitution Unit, UCL).

 

 

 

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Emmanuel Mahieux (PhD student)

 

After obtaining an MPhil in Politics (Oxford, 2015), Emmanuel worked as an operative for a political campaign. He then worked in a leading communications agency for two years before starting a PhD program in political psychology at UCL. Emmanuel’s research focuses on the psychological and cognitive profile of ‘swing’ voters. Emmanuel is supervised by Lee and Joe Devlin (UCL).​

 

 

 

 

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David Young (MPhil)

 

David studied Psychology at UCL where he was awarded the Plotkin Prize for the best undergraduate Psychology dissertation. His undergraduate project was in the domain of judgment biases, and tested competing theoretical predictions about the causes and boundary conditions of the well-known 'anchoring' effect. His MPhil research will explore individual differences, and country level differences in the extent of ‘policy aligned’ voting decisions.  ​

 

 

 

 

 

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Liza Karmannaya (MPhil)

 

Liza studied Psychology and Language Sciences at UCL, where she researched the language preferences of people with different political views for her third year project. For her MPhil she will extend this research to twitter, applying network clustering algorithms, and natural language processing techniques to better understand linguistic differences associated with different political dispositions. ​

 

 

 

 

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Summer Research Students (2019):

 

Chen Zhanyi (Eva) is a Laidlaw Scholar researching individual differences in essentialism and their relation to political leaning. Eva studies Social Sciences with Quantitative research methods at UCL, and is also working for NatCen over the summer. 

 

Leonor Feio is a Laidlaw Scholar researching individual differences in attribution biases and their relation to political leaning. Leonor studies Psychology and Language Sciences at UCL, and is also serving as a journalist at the European Youth Parliament over the summer. 

 

Sam Lloyd is an EPS summer student researching more objective measures of individual differences in attributional style and inferences about agency in relation to political learning. Sam studies Psychology and Behavioural Science (PBS). 

 

James Ackland is a Grindley summer student who will work on data analysis and visualization for some of our ongoing immigration framing projects. James studies Human Social and Political Science (HSPS).