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This list is intended to include all talks and seminars taking place in the Department of Psychology and certain related institutions.
Updated: 35 min 55 sec ago

Thu 14 Oct 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Sat, 20/03/2021 - 22:08
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Sat, 20/03/2021 - 17:06
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Sat, 20/03/2021 - 17:01
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Thu 14 Oct 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Sat, 20/03/2021 - 17:01
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Fri 12 Mar 16:30: Rethinking food reward

Mon, 08/03/2021 - 16:49
Rethinking food reward

The conscious perception of the hedonic sensory properties of caloric foods is commonly believed to guide our dietary choices. Current and traditional models implicate these consciously perceived hedonic qualities of food as driving overeating, whereas subliminal signals arising from the gut would curb our uncontrolled desire for calories. In this talk I will review recent animal and human studies that support a markedly different model for food reward. These findings reveal in particular the existence of subcortical body-to-brain neural pathways linking gastrointestinal nutrient sensors to the brain’s reward regions. In this model, gut-brain reward pathways bypass cranial taste and aroma sensory receptors and the cortical networks that give rise to flavor perception. They instead reinforce behaviors independently of the cognitive processes that support overt insights in the nature of our dietary decisions. We will also consider several examples of how modern processed foods impact this circuit to drive overeating.

  • Speaker: Dr Dana Small Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology; Director, Modern Diet and Physiology Research Center
  • Friday 12 March 2021, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Tristan Bekinschtein.

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Wed 03 Mar 16:00: PhD Research Talks - Sakshi Ghai and Cecilie Steenbuch Traberg

Tue, 02/03/2021 - 11:04
PhD Research Talks - Sakshi Ghai and Cecilie Steenbuch Traberg

Sakshi Ghai: “Scoping Review: Examining the impact of smartphones in Global North versus Global South research contexts” Technologies like smartphones are becoming increasingly widespread around the world, indeed “more households in developing countries own a mobile phone than have access to electricity or clean water” (World Bank Development Report, 2016). While these emerging technologies can promote positive change, they are also exacerbating disparities in the Global South. High-quality behavioral science research has the potential to locate and address such changes. In this pre-registered scoping review, we investigate the cultural diversity of samples to gain critical insights into the impact of emerging technologies on different populations. How might a potential bias towards studying ‘WEIRD’ populations be affecting research outcomes? Could such a bias be inadvertently marginalizing perspectives of non-WEIRD populations, and mislead researchers into generalizing the impact of digital technologies from WEIRD populations onto populations that are inherently different? Our review provides a systematic perspective on the impact of such emerging technologies and how generalizable the current literature is. These analyses will provide important insights for intervention science which is increasingly operating in a digital world.

Cecilie Steenbuch Traberg: “Birds of a Feather Persuaded Together: Investigating the Effects of Political Source Congruence on Susceptibility and Resistance to (Mis)information” While misinformation poses one of the most pressing global threats to societal well-being, research has demonstrated that individuals can be inoculated against misinformation from fictitious sources. However, as source similarity increases likelihood of persuasion, this raises the question of whether individuals are more susceptible to misinformation from well-known, ideologically congruent sources, and if so, whether inoculation interventions are effective under such conditions. Across two experiments, we show that political congruence with news sources increases susceptibility to misinformation for both liberal and conservative participants, and that this effect is mediated by source credibility judgements. Despite this increase in susceptibility, we further demonstrate that the inoculation intervention, the Fake News Game, successfully reduces susceptibility to misinformation from politically congruent sources. These findings add to current understandings of source effects in the online news environment and provide evidence for inoculation as a strategy for reducing the influence of misinformation even from politically similar sources.

Both speakers are PhD students in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge

Zoom link: https://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/study/grads/grads/spss-joining-details.

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Thu 27 May 12:30: Translational medicine in Alzheimer’s disease – taking the unfolded protein response as a therapeutic target in to clinical trials. Chair: Prof John O'Brien

Wed, 24/02/2021 - 10:49
Translational medicine in Alzheimer’s disease – taking the unfolded protein response as a therapeutic target in to clinical trials.

Abstract: Pioneering work by Professor Giovanna Mallucci here in Cambridge has identified decreased protein synthesis arising from chronic over-activation of the unfolded protein response as a key pathological event in dementia. Furthermore, work in her lab has identified a number of licensed drugs as potentially reversing this and rescuing disease phenotypes. In this talk I will recap some of this laboratory work before focussing on how we are translating this work in terms of experimental medicine and clinical trials.

Biography: Ben Underwood studied natural science at Oxford University and medicine in London. He then worked in neurology and Accident and Emergency before coming to Cambridge in 2002. Here he completed his psychiatric training and a PhD with Professor David Rubinsztein looking at the application of autophagy up-regulating drugs as possible disease modifying agents in dementia. He carried out the first trial of one of these drugs, rilmenidine, in Huntington’s disease patients. He has been a consultant old age psychiatrist for ten years but has maintained an interest in clinical trials in dementia. He is currently the clinical lead for dementia in the East of England for the Clinical Research Network (CRN) and national lead for stratified medicine in dementia and co-organises the University MPhil in translational medicine.

Ben is the deputy medical director at CPFT and clinical director of the older people and adult community directorate and the Windsor Unit, which was a key contributor to the successful trial of the Oxford coronavirus vaccine. Encouraged by this success he will become a lecturer in older people’s health at the University of Cambridge from April 2021 and clinical director of the Gnodde Goldman Sachs translational neuroscience unit, which seeks to be a vehicle connecting patients with dementia to the latest research through experimental medicine and clinical trials with a focus on translating the basic science discoveries from Professor Giovanna Mallucci.

Chair: Prof John O'Brien

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Thu 13 May 12:30: What’s behind the trauma Chair: Dr Paul Wilkinson

Wed, 24/02/2021 - 10:38
What’s behind the trauma

Abstract: Children who have experienced abuse and neglect are much more likely than their peers to also have neurodevelopmental problems such as ADHD and Autism…and our behavioural genetic findings suggest that the abuse and neglect does not cause these neurodevelopmental problems. This talk will discuss the complex interplay between neurodevelopment and maltreatment, including implications for clinical practice in both child and adult psychiatry

Biography: Helen Minnis has a longstanding clinical and research focus on the mental health problems associated with abuse and neglect. This has included investigating the clinical features, population prevalence and behavioural genetics of Attachment Disorders and investigating the way trauma and neurodevelopmental problems contribute towards the development of severe mental illness. She is currently leading three randomised controlled trials of complex interventions for children who have experienced, or are at risk of, maltreatment. These involve a wide range of multi-agency partners including colleagues from social care, education, and the judiciary. For detailed biography of Prof Minnis, please visit: https://www.gla.ac.uk/researchinstitutes/healthwellbeing/staff/helenminnis/

Chair: Dr Paul Wilkinson

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Fri 26 Feb 16:30: An auditory thread: music, sleep, brain stimulation, and neuroplasticity

Sun, 21/02/2021 - 09:19
An auditory thread: music, sleep, brain stimulation, and neuroplasticity

Our lab focuses on neuroplasticity associated with complex tasks, using musicianship (and its interaction with language) as a model. We use a variety of neuroimaging tools (i.e. MEG , EEG, fMRI, DWI , VBM) to study the neural bases of auditory processing, hearing-in-noise, and musician advantages, and their relation to training. We are also combining these areas with new techniques that can causally influence sleep-dependent memory consolidation, such as closed-loop auditory stimulation. Ultimately, our goals are to understand how training and sleep interventions can maintain auditory and language function, and improve learning and quality of life throughout the lifespan.

In this talk, I will trace a thread through our recent work, starting with how neurophysiological measures of sound musical pitch and vowels vary amongst individuals and according to musical and linguistic expertise. I will discuss results linking the quality of basic sound encoding to important functions like understanding speech in noisy conditions, and then will show some of our new preliminary work on how the brain both processes sounds differently in sleep, and how the sleeping brain’s processes are in turn susceptible to influences of precisely-timed sounds.

Mini Bio: Dr. Coffey is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Concordia University, in Montreal, Canada. She received a Ph.D. in Neuroscience in 2016 from McGill University (with Prof. Robert Zatorre), an M.Sc. (Research) in Brain and Cognitive Science in 2009 from the University of Amsterdam, and a B.Sc. (Honours) in Psychology from the University of Ottawa in 2006. Between 2006 and 2009 she worked as a Human Behaviour and Performance specialist and trainer at the European Space Agency (European Astronaut Centre, Cologne, Germany), and between 2002 and 2005 as a flight and theory instructor on light aircraft at several airports in Ottawa, Canada. Most recently, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, under the supervision of Prof. Jan Born.

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Thu 29 Apr 12:30: Striatal dopamine computations in learning about agency Chair: Prof Paul Fletcher

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 15:07
Striatal dopamine computations in learning about agency

Abstract: The basal ganglia and dopaminergic systems are well studied for their roles in reinforcement learning and reward-based decision making. Much work focuses on “reward prediction error” (RPE) signals conveyed by dopamine and used for learning. Computational considerations suggest that such signals may be enriched beyond the classical global and scalar RPE computation, to support more structured learning in distinct sub-circuits (“vector RPEs”). Such signals allow an agent to assign credit to the level of action selection most likely responsible for the outcomes, and hence to enhance learning depending on the generative task statistics. Experimental data from mice will be presented, showing spatiotemporal dynamics of dopamine terminal activity and release across the dorsal striatum in the form of traveling waves that support learning about agency.

Biography: Prof Frank received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience & Psychology (joint) at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2004. After working as a Professor at the University of Arizona, he joined the Brown University’s Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Science department in 2011, where he is currently an Edgar L. Marston Professor. His research combines multiple levels of computational modelling and experimental work to understand the neural mechanisms underlying reinforcement learning, decision making and cognitive control. His lab also develops neural circuit and algorithmic models of systems-level interactions between multiple brain areas (primarily prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia and their modulation by dopamine). For detailed biography of Prof Frank, please visit: http://ski.cog.brown.edu/

Chair: Prof Paul Fletcher

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Thu 22 Apr 12:30: Psychedelics: brain mechanisms Chair: Dr Graham Murray

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 11:56
Psychedelics: brain mechanisms Abstract: The talk takes a multi-level approach to the question of how psychedelics work in the brain. Key themes include:
  • the pharmacology of classic serotonergic psychedelics,
  • what this tells us about the function and evolutionary purpose of the serotonin 2A receptor,
  • the acute brain effects of psychedelics as determined by functional brain imaging,
  • the entropic brain hypothesis,
  • current evidence for psychedelic therapy,
  • the new ‘REBUS’ hierarchical predictive processing model of the action of psychedelics, and
  • how this maps on to the phenomenology of the acute psychedelic experience and therapeutic outcomes.

Biography: Dr Robin Carhart-Harris moved to Imperial College London in 2008 after obtaining a PhD in Psychopharmacology from the University of Bristol and an MA in Psychoanalysis from Brunel University. At Imperial, Robin has designed and completed human brain imaging studies with LSD , psilocybin, MDMA and DMT , a clinical trial of psilocybin for treatment-resistant depression, a double-blind randomised controlled trial comparing psilocybin with escitalopram for major depressive disorder and a multimodal imaging study in healthy volunteers receiving psilocybin for the first time. Robin founded the Centre for Psychedelic Research at Imperial College London in April 2019, the first of its kind in the world. For more detailed, please visit: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/people/r.carhart-harris

Chair: Dr Graham Murray

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Thu 11 Mar 12:30: Going beyond 60 years of D2 blockers: what underlies psychosis and the implications for new treatments Chair: Dr Emilio Fernandez-Egea

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 11:53
Going beyond 60 years of D2 blockers: what underlies psychosis and the implications for new treatments

Abstract: This talk will present data on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying psychosis from imaging studies in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, as well as from people at high and low genetic risk. Data from a preclinical model that reproduces the imaging findings and the evaluation of a novel non-D2 treatment target will be presented. Finally, treatment resistance and outstanding questions will be considered.

Biography: Oliver Howes is Professor of Molecular Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College, London and Programme Leader at the MRC London Institute of Medicine, Imperial College, London. His clinical work is as Consultant Psychiatrist at The Maudsley Hospital, where he runs a service for people with psychoses. His research interests centre on the causes and treatment of affective and psychotic disorders. His recent work has focussed on understanding the role of dopamine and neuroinflammation in the development of psychosis, the effects of antipsychotic drugs, & the causes of cognitive impairments. For detailed biography of Prof Howes, please visit: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/people/oliver-howes and https://www.imperial.ac.uk/people/oliver.howes

Chair: Dr Emilio Fernandez-Egea

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Thu 04 Mar 12:30: Opportunities and Pitfalls from a Decade of Discovery in Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion disorder) Chair: Dr Valerie Voon

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 11:49
Opportunities and Pitfalls from a Decade of Discovery in Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion disorder)

Abstract: The new millennium marked a real turning point for clinical and research interest in FND and the last decade has seen this interest accelerate further. National and international patient organisations, an international medical society, large scale randomised treatment trials and many new research publications point to this progress.

In this talk I will consider this decade or so of progress highlighting what this may mean in terms of opportunities for progress, particularly for the current poor prognosis of people with FND . I will also highlight the pitfalls of this new found focus on FND and ways in which the progress that has been made might be swiftly turned back to the detriment of people with FND and healthcare in general

Biography: Mark Edwards is Professor of Neurology at St George’s University of London and The Atkinson Morley Regional Neuroscience Service at St George’s University Hospital. He has a specialist clinical and research interest in Movement Disorders and Functional Neurological Disorder (FND). He is an active part of the specialist movement disorders and deep brain stimulation team at the Atkinson Morley Regional Neuroscience Centre, and continues electrophysiological and psychophysical research work into the pathophysiology and treatment of movement disorders in general. For detailed biography of Prof Edwards, please visit: https://www.sgul.ac.uk/profiles/mark-edwards#overview

Chair: Dr Valerie Voon

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Thu 22 Apr 12:30: Psychedelics: brain mechanisms Chair: Dr Graham Murray

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 11:36
Psychedelics: brain mechanisms Abstract: The talk takes a multi-level approach to the question of how psychedelics work in the brain. Key themes include:
  • the pharmacology of classic serotonergic psychedelics,
  • what this tells us about the function and evolutionary purpose of the serotonin 2A receptor,
  • the acute brain effects of psychedelics as determined by functional brain imaging,
  • the entropic brain hypothesis,
  • current evidence for psychedelic therapy,
  • the new ‘REBUS’ hierarchical predictive processing model of the action of psychedelics, and
  • how this maps on to the phenomenology of the acute psychedelic experience and therapeutic outcomes.

Biography: Dr Robin Carhart-Harris moved to Imperial College London in 2008 after obtaining a PhD in Psychopharmacology from the University of Bristol and an MA in Psychoanalysis from Brunel University. At Imperial, Robin has designed and completed human brain imaging studies with LSD , psilocybin, MDMA and DMT , a clinical trial of psilocybin for treatment-resistant depression, a double-blind randomised controlled trial comparing psilocybin with escitalopram for major depressive disorder and a multimodal imaging study in healthy volunteers receiving psilocybin for the first time. Robin founded the Centre for Psychedelic Research at Imperial College London in April 2019, the first of its kind in the world.

Chair: Dr Graham Murray

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Thu 25 Mar 12:30: Neurocognitive Predictors of Depression Relapse Chair: Dr Rudolf Cardinal

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 11:32
Neurocognitive Predictors of Depression Relapse

Abstract: The burden of depression is to no small part due to its chronic or recurring nature. As such, the maintenance of any treatment gains is of paramount importance. A key step in this process is the decision to discontinue antidepressant medication. However, at present there are no predictors to indicate who can safely discontinue medication. The AIDA study recruited 123 patients who had remitted on antidepressant medication and were intent on discontinuing their medication. Patients were randomized into two groups. Both groups underwent two extensive assessments involving clinical, behavioural, imaging and biochemical assessments, but one group was tested before and after discontinuing antidepressants, while the other was tested twice before discontinuation. Patients were followed up for 6 months to monitor for relapses. 57 healthy, never-depressed matched controls were recruited. Of 104 patients who completed at least one assessment, 84 completed the study, with 34 relapsing during the follow-up. Amongst standard clinical variables, only treatment by non-specialists was robustly associated with relapse (p=0.005), but did not predict relapse out-of-sample. In contrast, several behavioural (effort-related), psychological (brooding rumination, neuroticism) and imaging (EEG alpha asymmetry and task-related fMRI amygdala activation) variables had predictive power, while resting-state connectivity showed some effects of discontinuation. Overall, relapse after antidepressant discontinuation can be predicted by a number of variables. A combination of these may reach an accuracy sufficient to have clinical relevance.

Biography: Dr Huys is a Clinical Associate Professor in Computational Psychiatry at the Division of Psychiatry and the Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research at University College London, and an Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist with the Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust. He started training at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University, followed by a MB/PhD at UCL Medical School and the Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit (with Peter Dayan). Dr Huys research interest is in Computational psychiatry, with particular focus on developing computational tools to improve patient outcomes in depression and addictive disorders. For detailed biography of Dr Huys, please visit: https://quentinhuys.com/index.html

Chair: Dr Rudolf Cardinal

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Thu 18 Mar 12:30: A digital revolution for mental health science Chair: Dr Rudolf Cardinal

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 11:31
A digital revolution for mental health science

Abstract: As our understanding of the neurobiological and cognitive correlates of mental health and illness has grown through decades of research, one thing has become clear: Things are more complicated than we might have hoped. Many small effects, spanning genetic, biological, psychosocial, lifestyle, environmental and psychological levels of analysis, conspire to confer individual risk. These factors interact with one another in ways we are only beginning to understand and have not yet been able to leverage in the clinic – in part due to low power and a preponderance of cross-sectional studies. In this talk, I’ll describe recent efforts to use Internet-based methods to scale up research in mental health, in particular within-subject, longitudinal and treatment-related study designs. I’ll discuss how this involves a challenging but necessary shift from clinician-assigned diagnosis towards self-report assessments and share our experience trialling a range of methods that allow us to follow significant numbers of people through time. These include the analysis of archival twitter data as a proxy for momentary fluctuations in mood, a fully internet-based longitudinal treatment prediction study and the development of a smartphone app (http://www.neureka.ie) that aims to achieve a relatively deep characterisation of ‘brain health’ in the population at large.

Biography: Dr Gillan gained her PhD at the University of Cambridge in 2013 under the supervision of Trevor Robbins. She is currently an Associate Professor at Trinity Institute of Neurosciences, Trinity College Dublin. Her lab, Gillan Lab, is interested in developing novel approaches to studying brain health in psychiatric and ageing populations – a key goal is to develop objective tests that can be used to predict who will respond to which treatment. For detailed biography of Dr Gillan, please visit:”https://gillanlab.com/

Chair: Dr Rudolf Cardinal

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Thu 11 Mar 12:30: Going beyond 60 years of D2 blockers: what underlies psychosis and the implications for new treatments Chair: Dr Emilio Fernandez-Egea

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 11:25
Going beyond 60 years of D2 blockers: what underlies psychosis and the implications for new treatments

Abstract: This talk will present data on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying psychosis from imaging studies in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, as well as from people at high and low genetic risk. Data from a preclinical model that reproduces the imaging findings and the evaluation of a novel non-D2 treatment target will be presented. Finally, treatment resistance and outstanding questions will be considered.

Biography: Oliver Howes is Professor of Molecular Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College, London and Programme Leader at the MRC London Institute of Medicine, Imperial College, London. His clinical work is as Consultant Psychiatrist at The Maudsley Hospital, where he runs a service for people with psychoses.

His research interests centre on the causes and treatment of affective and psychotic disorders. His recent work has focussed on understanding the role of dopamine and neuroinflammation in the development of psychosis, the effects of antipsychotic drugs, & the causes of cognitive impairments. This work has been recognised through a number of awards including the Royal College of Psychiatrists Researcher of the Year Award (2017), Schizophrenia International Research Society Rising Star Award (2013), European Psychiatric Association Biological Psychiatry Prize (2012), the Royal Society of Medicine Psychiatry Prize (2010), and the British Association of Psychopharmacology Clinical Psychopharmacology Prize (2007). In 2019 Web of Science named him as one of the most influential researchers in the world based on high impact papers over the last decade. He was elected as a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2020.

During lockdown he received a prize from his local running club for running downhill the most times. Other career highlights include working as a junior potato scrubber on a farm. He spends his spare time trying to find the world’s best ice-cream.

Chair: Dr Emilio Fernandez-Egea

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Thu 25 Feb 13:00: Behavioral addictions: COVID-19 considerations and more (NOTE time: 1-2 pm) Chair: Prof Ed Bullmore

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 10:44
Behavioral addictions: COVID-19 considerations and more (NOTE time: 1-2 pm)

Abstract: Disorders due to addictive behaviors (also known as behavioral addictions) have been included in the eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). Both gambling disorder and gaming disorder are formal diagnostic entities in the ICD -11, and other behaviors (e.g., social networking, buying/shopping and pornography viewing) have also been proposed as foci of potential disorders. A common element across these conditions is the ability to engage in them via the internet. During COVID -19, considerable changes in internet use have been observed, raising questions regarding problematic and healthy use of the internet during the pandemic and thereafter. In this presentation, data regarding gambling, gaming and pornography use during the pandemic will be presented, as will guidances and prevention recommendations regarding how to promote healthy use of the internet.

Biography: Dr. Potenza is a board-certified psychiatrist with sub-specialty training in addiction psychiatry. He has trained at Yale University receiving a combined BS/MS with Honors in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics and a PhD in Cell Biology, the latter concurrent with the MD through the Medical Scientist Training Program. He completed internship, psychiatric residency and addiction psychiatry fellowship training at Yale. Currently, he is a Professor of Psychiatry, Child Study and Neuroscience at the Yale University School of Medicine where he is the Director of the Division on Addictions Research, the Problem Gambling Clinic, the Center of Excellence in Gambling Research, the Women and Addictive Disorders Core of Women’s Health Research at Yale and the Yale Research Program on Impulsivity and Impulse Control Disorders. He is also a Senior Research Scientist at the Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling. He is on the editorial boards of fifteen journals (including editor-in-chief of Current Addiction Reports) and has received multiple national and international awards for excellence in research and clinical care. Recently, he has received lifetime achievement research awards from the Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling and the National Council on Problem Gambling and research awards from the Society for the Advancement of Sexual Health and Turkish Green Crescent Society (Phoenix Award for Addiction Research). He has consulted to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Registry of Effective Programs, National Institutes of Health, American Psychiatric Association and World Health Organization (WHO) on matters of addiction. He has participated in two DSM -5 research work groups and six annual WHO meetings relating to Internet use and addictive behaviors in the ICD -11, addressing topics relating to gambling, gaming, impulse control, and addiction.

Dr. Potenza’s research has focused on the neurobiology and treatment of substance and non-substance (behavioral) addictions and other disorders characterized by impaired impulse control and reward-related motivations. The majority of this work has focused on understanding clinical and neurobiological underpinnings of these disorders, and their co-occurrences with other mental health disorders, in order to advance prevention and treatment strategies. Dr. Potenza’s research has applied brain imaging, genetic, epidemiological and clinical trials methodologies to gain knowledge and improve prevention and treatment strategies for addictive disorders. This work has also involved identifying potential intermediary phenotypes, like facets of impulsivity, that may in part explain the high rates of co-occurrence between psychiatric conditions and might represent novel targets for prevention and treatment strategies.

Chair: Prof Ed Bullmore

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Thu 11 Mar 12:30: Going beyond 60 years of D2 blockers: what underlies psychosis and the implications for new treatments Chair: Dr Emilio Fernandez-Egea

Thu, 18/02/2021 - 10:42
Going beyond 60 years of D2 blockers: what underlies psychosis and the implications for new treatments

Abstract: This talk will present data on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying psychosis from imaging studies in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, as well as from people at high and low genetic risk. Data from a preclinical model that reproduces the imaging findings and the evaluation of a novel non-D2 treatment target will be presented. Finally, treatment resistance and outstanding questions will be considered.

Chair: Dr Emilio Fernandez-Egea

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