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Department of Psychology

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This list is intended to include all talks and seminars taking place in the Department of Psychology and certain related institutions.
Updated: 32 min 57 sec ago

Mon 29 Apr 12:50: Brain age prediction using diffusion MRI data

Thu, 18/04/2024 - 12:25
Brain age prediction using diffusion MRI data

Abstract: James Bacon is an MS Physics student at the University of Cambridge. He will present the work from his summer internship where he worked on brain age prediction using diffusion MRI data.

The talk will start at ~12:50 following a MEG project presentation which starts at 12:30.

Venue: MRC CBU West Wing Seminar Room and Zoom https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82385113580?pwd=RmxIUmphQW9Ud1JBby9nTDQzR0NRdz09

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Mon 20 May 12:30: ISMRM highlights

Thu, 18/04/2024 - 12:24
ISMRM highlights

Abstract: Attendees of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) conference will share and discuss the most significant advancements and research findings presented.

Venue: MRC CBU West Wing Seminar Room and Zoom https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82385113580?pwd=RmxIUmphQW9Ud1JBby9nTDQzR0NRdz09

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Mon 29 Apr 12:50: Brain age prediction using diffusion MRI data

Thu, 18/04/2024 - 12:07
Brain age prediction using diffusion MRI data

James Bacon is an MS Physics student at the University of Cambridge. He will present the work from his summer internship where he worked on brain age prediction using diffusion MRI data.

The talk will start at ~12:50 following a MEG project presentation which starts at 12:30.

Venue: MRC CBU West Wing Seminar Room and Zoom https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82385113580?pwd=RmxIUmphQW9Ud1JBby9nTDQzR0NRdz09

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Wed 24 Apr 15:00: Social and political change in diverse societies: Insights from largescale panel studies

Thu, 18/04/2024 - 09:18
Social and political change in diverse societies: Insights from largescale panel studies

Largescale panel studies, with stratified, random samples of a nation’s population, are relatively rare in the psychological literature. By measuring change at multiple levels over long periods of time, these studies can tell us about the relationship between individuals and the societies in which they live. This includes (1) how features of the social structure, such as inequality or deprivation, affect people and (2) how people affect the social structure (via their policy preferences and political behaviour). I will review recent research on these two key elements of societal functioning – structural effects and structural change – from two panels in very different contexts. The first is a 13-wave longitudinal study of around 20,000 New Zealanders. The second is a 3-wave study of around 160,000 people in India. I will also introduce a new panel from the UK, where we invite 500,000 people randomly sampled from the electoral register to participate in survey of social and political attitudes annually over five years. This research programme demonstrates how largescale panel data can inform theory and policy, by telling us more about how people change, and how they change their societies.

The talk is open to the public.

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Thu 16 May 12:30: TBA

Wed, 17/04/2024 - 15:23
TBA

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Thu 16 May 12:30: TBA

Wed, 17/04/2024 - 15:23
TBA

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Thu 16 May 12:30: TBA

Wed, 17/04/2024 - 15:23
TBA

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Thu 10 Oct 12:30: TBA

Tue, 16/04/2024 - 12:43
TBA

Abstract not available

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Thu 30 May 12:30: Mental health in showmen

Tue, 16/04/2024 - 11:37
Mental health in showmen

Abstract not available

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Tue 11 Jun 09:30: Child Development Forum Easter II

Sun, 14/04/2024 - 11:20
Child Development Forum Easter II

Speakers TBA

Child Development Forum are a series of talks bringing together researchers of infant, child and adolescent development across the University of Cambridge.

Talks are termly, and usually held at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit (Chaucer Road).

Join the mailing list to kept up-to-date, and sign up to give a talk:

https://lists.cam.ac.uk/sympa/info/ucam-childdevforum

This talk is part of the Child Development Forum (CDF) series.

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Fri 17 May 16:30: The Cognitive Biology of Language The host for this talk is Jeff Dalley

Thu, 11/04/2024 - 15:21
The Cognitive Biology of Language

The cognitive revolution in the middle of the last century has transformed the ways in which we study the human mind. Curiously, when it comes to language there is a growing behaviourist trend, where it is regarded as an acquired skill, not unlike the way in which Large Language Models (LLMs) work. In contrast, linguists in the Generative Grammar tradition consider the faculty of language to be a computational system within the mind, part of the human biological endowment. This means that biological aspects of language, in particular evolution, development, and (neural) mechanisms, are open to investigation. I will discuss recent work on ‘comparative linguistics’, particularly the behavioural, neural and cognitive parallels between human language and birdsong, and what we can and cannot conclude from it. The current behaviourist view of language has led to the rapid rise of LLMs, although these AI models are actually not about language at all. Natural language appears to be unique to the human mind, and has no parallels either in animal or artificial intelligence.

The host for this talk is Jeff Dalley

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Wed 24 Apr 15:00: Social and political change in diverse societies: Insights from largescale panel studies

Wed, 10/04/2024 - 15:19
Social and political change in diverse societies: Insights from largescale panel studies

Largescale panel studies, with stratified, random samples of a nation’s population, are relatively rare in the psychological literature. By measuring change at multiple levels over long periods of time, these studies can tell us about the relationship between individuals and the societies in which they live. This includes (1) how features of the social structure, such as inequality or deprivation, affect people and (2) how people affect the social structure (via their policy preferences and political behaviour). I will review recent research on these two key elements of societal functioning – structural effects and structural change – from two panels in very different contexts. The first is a 13-wave longitudinal study of around 20,000 New Zealanders. The second is a 3-wave study of around 160,000 people in India. I will also introduce a new panel from the UK, where we invite 500,000 people randomly sampled from the electoral register to participate in survey of social and political attitudes annually over five years. This research programme demonstrates how largescale panel data can inform theory and policy, by telling us more about how people change, and how they change their societies.

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Thu 06 Jun 14:00: The role of reward in language learning

Tue, 26/03/2024 - 13:15
The role of reward in language learning

Abstract not available

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Thu 16 May 14:00: Sleep to forget unwanted memories

Tue, 26/03/2024 - 13:13
Sleep to forget unwanted memories

Abstract not available

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