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Department of Psychology

 
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This list is intended to include all talks and seminars taking place in the Department of Psychology and certain related institutions.
Updated: 12 min 4 sec ago

Thu 21 Oct 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Thu, 08/07/2021 - 15:43
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

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Thu 18 Nov 12:30: How does emotion influence similarity perception

Mon, 14/06/2021 - 09:15
How does emotion influence similarity perception

Biography: Dr Deborah Talmi is a cognitive neuroscientist, interested in emotional cognition – the effect that emotional value has on our cognitive system. The core of her research is the emotional value of the events that we experience. To induce emotional value in the lab she uses monetary reward, pain and taste stimuli, and pictures that depict distressing scenes. Her aim is to understand how our brains convert such input to neural representation of value and subjective feelings. Her main focus is on how the emotional value of experience influences later memory for these experiences. For detailed biography of Dr Talmi, please visit: https://www.lucy.cam.ac.uk/fellows/dr-deborah-talmi

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Thu 07 Oct 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Thu, 10/06/2021 - 17:02
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Abstract not available

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Thu 18 Nov 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Thu, 10/06/2021 - 17:01
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Thu 09 Dec 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Thu, 10/06/2021 - 13:51
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Thu 02 Dec 12:30: How local and global metacognition shape mental health

Thu, 03/06/2021 - 16:26
How local and global metacognition shape mental health

Biography Dr Stephen Fleming is a Sir Henry Dale Wellcome Trust/Royal Society Fellow at the Department of Experimental Psychology, Prinicipal Investigator at the Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, and Group Leader at the Max Planck-UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research. Dr Fleming’s research combines experimental and theoretical approaches (psychophysics, computational modelling, neuroimaging) to understand how people become self-aware of aspects of their cognition and behaviour (such as perception, memory and decision-making), and why such awareness is often impaired in psychiatric and neurological disorders. For detailed biography of Dr Fleming, please visit http://metacoglab.org/people

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Thu 11 Nov 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Wed, 02/06/2021 - 16:13
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

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Thu 10 Jun 12:30: Experts by Personal and Professional Experience: A Novel Anti-Stigma Intervention Targeting Healthcare Professionals and Students Chair: Dr Rashid Zaman

Wed, 02/06/2021 - 16:12
Experts by Personal and Professional Experience: A Novel Anti-Stigma Intervention Targeting Healthcare Professionals and Students

Abstract: Mental health problems are over-represented in healthcare workers, including doctors and psychiatrists. The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated this. However, stigma and a culture of shame are major barriers to mental healthcare services and consequently many healthcare workers with mental health problems continue to suffer in silence despite the availability of effective treatment the consequences of which can be tragic and fatal. In this talk we discuss the unique role that Experts by Personal and Professional Experience (EPPE) or ‘Wounded Healers’ can play at reducing mental health related stigma, breaking down the barriers to mental healthcare services and ‘harmonizing’ relations between mental healthcare providers and receivers.

Biography: Dr Ahmed Hankir is Academic Clinical Fellow in General Adult Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King’s College London, Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Mental Health Research in association with Cambridge University and Public Education and Engagement Lead for the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, Disabilities and Human Rights at the Institute for Mental Health at the University of Nottingham. Dr Hankir’s research interests include global and Muslim mental health and pioneering and evaluating innovative programmes that challenge mental health related stigma and Islamophobia. Dr Hankir is co-editor of three textbooks on psychiatry and faith with senior members of the American Psychiatric Association. Dr Hankir is the recipient of numerous prestigious awards notably the Royal College of Psychiatrists Foundation Doctor of the Year Award, the Royal College of Psychiatrists Core Psychiatric Trainee of the Year Award and twice a Finalist for the Royal College of Psychiatrists Psychiatric Communicator of the Year Award.

Chair: Dr Rashid Zaman

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Thu 14 Oct 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Wed, 02/06/2021 - 16:12
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Abstract not available

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Thu 14 Oct 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Wed, 02/06/2021 - 16:12
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Thu 14 Oct 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Wed, 02/06/2021 - 16:12
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Thu 04 Nov 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Wed, 02/06/2021 - 16:12
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Wed 02 Jun 16:00: Having a Voice in Your Group: Field Experiments on Behavioral and Attitudinal Changes

Fri, 28/05/2021 - 16:55
Having a Voice in Your Group: Field Experiments on Behavioral and Attitudinal Changes

One of the founding assumptions of social psychology is that groups influence human behavior—in particular, that an attempt to change a person’s behavior will fail in the long run if it does not involve her group. There has been enormous research interest in how groups motivate behavior change, but debates exist about the types of group structures that motivate change, and causal evidence with real world groups is rare. I conduct two field experiments in different contexts and with different populations to test the influence of increasing the participatory nature of groups over long-term behavior and attitudes. Study 1 experiments with 65 work group (1,792 workers) in a multinational factory in China. Study 2 experiments with 32 staff groups (172 workers) in an elite university in the US. In each experiment, half of the groups were randomly assigned to a 20-minute participatory meeting once per week for six weeks, in which workers were invited to speak and supervisors mandated to listen. The other half of the groups continued with status quo meetings. Participatory meetings led to a 10.6% increase in treatment factory workers’ productivity, which endured for 9 weeks after the experiment. I found that the frequency of voice within the group, rather than information or goals, drove the behavioral change. The treatment also led workers to be less authoritarian and more critical about societal authority and justice, and more willing to participate in political, social, and familial decision-making. Results in study 2 replicated such findings. This research highlights the power of participatory group dynamics in changing behavior and generalized attitudes across different contexts, both for theoretical understanding and pragmatic intervention in behavioral and attitudinal change toward social institutions and hierarchy.

Dr Sherry Wu is Assistant Professor of Management and Organizations at UCLA Anderson School of Management

Zoom link available here: https://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/study/current-postgraduates/spss-joining-details

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Fri 28 May 16:15: Data-driven versus Hypothesis-driven approaches in cognitive neuroscience

Thu, 20/05/2021 - 18:03
Data-driven versus Hypothesis-driven approaches in cognitive neuroscience

The spectacular success of artificial intelligence in recent years has triggered a surge in the use of data-driven methods in many fields of research. In cognitive neuroscience, brain decoding and encoding paradigms based on machine learning have recently attracted a lot of attention. Yet, amid strong claims about the endless power of AI and how it is going to revolutionize the way we do research, legitimate questions arise: Is the age of good-old hypothesis-driven neuroscience coming to an end? And what is the added value, if any, of machine-learning powered data-driven brain research? In this talk, I will begin with an introduction to the basics of machine learning and then provide illustrative examples of how my lab combines electrophysiological brain measurements, spectral analyses and machine learning to probe the link between oscillatory brain dynamics and various cognitive processes. I also promise to show a lot of pandas on my slides.

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Wed 12 May 16:00: Origins of and solutions for conspiracy beliefs

Sun, 09/05/2021 - 20:20
Origins of and solutions for conspiracy beliefs

In this talk, I present a model of conspiracy beliefs. This model is useful to consider conspiracy theories in any domain and integrates disparate social, political, and psychological predictors that have been linked to conspiracy beliefs. In addition, the model identifies media and recipient fear as key to explaining why conspiracy beliefs are socially shared and how they emerge. I present data from five surveys, the first three (Surveys 1–3) about political and medical beliefs and the last two (Surveys 4–5) about the notion that a deep state undermines the success of President Donald Trump. Survey 5 was fielded during the first trial of impeachment of Donald J. Trump in 2019-2020. I then turn to two commonly proposed but actually opposing solutions to correct conspiracy beliefs: Inducing trust and increasing critical evaluation. I present four experiments that compare the efficacy of these solutions to reduce the impact of pseudoscientific messages concerning a virus ostensibly created as a bioweapon (Experiments 1-2) and genetically modified organisms (Experiments 3-4).

Dolores Albarracin is a Professor of Psychology, Business, and Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Zoom link available here: https://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/study/current-postgraduates/spss-joining-details

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Wed 12 May 16:00: Origins of and solutions for conspiracy beliefs

Sun, 09/05/2021 - 20:20
Origins of and solutions for conspiracy beliefs

In this talk, I present a model of conspiracy beliefs. This model is useful to consider conspiracy theories in any domain and integrates disparate social, political, and psychological predictors that have been linked to conspiracy beliefs. In addition, the model identifies media and recipient fear as key to explaining why conspiracy beliefs are socially shared and how they emerge. I present data from five surveys, the first three (Surveys 1–3) about political and medical beliefs and the last two (Surveys 4–5) about the notion that a deep state undermines the success of President Donald Trump. Survey 5 was fielded during the first trial of impeachment of Donald J. Trump in 2019-2020. I then turn to two commonly proposed but actually opposing solutions to correct conspiracy beliefs: Inducing trust and increasing critical evaluation. I present four experiments that compare the efficacy of these solutions to reduce the impact of pseudoscientific messages concerning a virus ostensibly created as a bioweapon (Experiments 1-2) and genetically modified organisms (Experiments 3-4).

Dolores Albarracin is a Professor of Psychology, Business, and Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Zoom link available here: https://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/study/current-postgraduates/spss-joining-details

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Thu 10 Jun 12:30: Experts by Personal and Professional Experience: A Novel Anti-Stigma Intervention Targeting Healthcare Professionals and Students Chair: Dr Rashid Zaman

Thu, 06/05/2021 - 09:17
Experts by Personal and Professional Experience: A Novel Anti-Stigma Intervention Targeting Healthcare Professionals and Students

Abstract: Mental health problems are over-represented in healthcare workers, including doctors and psychiatrists. The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated this. However, stigma and a culture of shame are major barriers to mental healthcare services and consequently many healthcare workers with mental health problems continue to suffer in silence despite the availability of effective treatment the consequences of which can be tragic and fatal. In this talk we discuss the unique role that Experts by Personal and Professional Experience (EPPE) or ‘Wounded Healers’ can play at reducing mental health related stigma, breaking down the barriers to mental healthcare services and ‘harmonizing’ relations between mental healthcare providers and receivers.

Biography: Dr Ahmed Hankir is Academic Clinical Fellow in General Adult Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King’s College London, Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Mental Health Research in association with Cambridge University and Public Education and Engagement Lead for the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, Disabilities and Human Rights at the Institute for Mental Health at the University of Nottingham. Dr Hankir’s research interests include global and Muslim mental health and pioneering and evaluating innovative programmes that challenge mental health related stigma and Islamophobia. Dr Hankir is co-editor of three textbooks on psychiatry and faith with senior members of the American Psychiatric Association. Dr Hankir is the recipient of numerous prestigious awards notably the Royal College of Psychiatrists Foundation Doctor of the Year Award, the Royal College of Psychiatrists Core Psychiatric Trainee of the Year Award and twice a Finalist for the Royal College of Psychiatrists Psychiatric Communicator of the Year Award.

Chair: Dr Rashid Zaman

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Fri 07 May 16:30: Brain Dynamics and Flexible Behaviors

Wed, 05/05/2021 - 16:55
Brain Dynamics and Flexible Behaviors

Executive control processes and flexible behaviors rely on the integrity of, and dynamic interactions between, large-scale functional brain networks. The right insular cortex is a critical component of a salience/midcingulo-insular network that is thought to mediate interactions between brain networks involved in externally oriented (central executive/lateral frontoparietal network) and internally oriented (default mode/medial frontoparietal network) processes. How these brain systems reconfigure with development is a critical question for cognitive neuroscience, with implications for neurodevelopmental pathologies affecting brain connectivity. I will describe studies examining how brain network dynamics support flexible behaviors in typical and atypical development, presenting evidence suggesting a unique role for the dorsal anterior insular from studies of meta-analytic connectivity modelling, dynamic functional connectivity, and structural connectivity. These findings from adults, typically developing children, and children with autism suggest that structural and functional maturation of insular pathways is a critical component of the process by which human brain networks mature to support complex, flexible cognitive processes throughout the lifespan

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Fri 28 May 16:30: TBA

Wed, 05/05/2021 - 16:55
TBA

Abstract not available

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Wed 05 May 16:00: For better or worse: The role of social identity in the Pandemic

Mon, 03/05/2021 - 16:14
For better or worse: The role of social identity in the Pandemic

We are in the midst of one of the greatest global health crises in the past century. In the absence of a vaccine, the major public health response has required massive collective behavior change—especially at the national level. In this talk, I will present several recent studies on the role of social identity in the coronavirus pandemic. I will illustrate how social identity can both facilitate and impair collective action. These studies will draw on the movement of millions of cell phones tracking human mobility in the US during the early stages of the pandemic as well as an international sample of health intentions in 67 countries. Together, these studies clarify how social identity might be leveraged effectively for global public health.

Jay Van Bavel is Associate Professor of Psychology & Neural Science at New York University and Director of the Social Identity and Morality Lab.

Zoom link available here: https://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/study/current-postgraduates/spss-joining-details

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