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This list is intended to include all talks and seminars taking place in the Department of Psychology and certain related institutions.
Updated: 28 min 22 sec ago

Thu 18 Mar 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Tue, 13/10/2020 - 15:13
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

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Wed 02 Dec 16:00: The Social and Political Implications of Moral Conviction

Tue, 13/10/2020 - 12:57
The Social and Political Implications of Moral Conviction

Scholars often assume that some issues globally evoke moral reactions, whether these issues are presented as moral dilemmas (e.g., trolley problems) or as controversial issues of the day (e.g., the legal status of abortion). There is considerable individual variation, however, in the degree that people report that their position on specific issues reflects their core moral convictions. Moreover, the degree to which people experience an attitude as a moral conviction has important social and political consequences, such as predicting increased political engagement (voting, activism, volunteerism), inoculation against the usual pressures to obey authorities and the law, resistance to majority influence, unwillingness to compromise, and greater acceptance of violent solutions to conflict. The normative implications of these and other findings are both reassuring (moral convictions can protect against obedience to potentially malevolent authorities) and terrifying (moral convictions are associated with rejection of the rule of law and can provide a motivational foundation for violent protest and acts of terrorism). Implications and directions for future research will be discussed.

Professor Skitka is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Zoom link to follow.

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Fri 30 Oct 16:30: Black Racial Stereotypes and Victim Blaming: Implications for Media Coverage and Criminal Proceedings in Cases of Police Violence against Racial and Ethnic Minorities Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with...

Mon, 12/10/2020 - 12:03
Black Racial Stereotypes and Victim Blaming: Implications for Media Coverage and Criminal Proceedings in Cases of Police Violence against Racial and Ethnic Minorities

This talk will examine how posthumous stereotypical media portrayals of racial and ethnic minority victims of police violence, in particular Black American victims, can influence public opinions about these victims and criminal proceedings for their killers.

Kristin Nicole Dukes, PhD, is the Dean for Institutional Diversity at Allegheny College. In this role she charged with shaping and implementing policies, strategies, and initiatives in support of the Allegheny College’s commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Prior to assuming the senior diversity officer role at Allegheny, Kristin was an Associate Professor of Psychology at Simmons University. Dr. Dukes earned her master’s and doctoral degrees in social psychology from Tufts University with a research focus on stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. She also holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Rice University. Dr. Dukes has published research in various outlets including the Journal of Social Issues and Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy and presented at numerous conferences including the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, and Society of Experimental Social Psychology. Notably, Dr. Dukes edited a 2017 volume of the Journal of Social Issues on police violence against racial/ethnic minorities in a global context titled What Social Science Research Says About Police Violence Against Racial and Ethnic Minorities: Understanding the Antecedents and Consequences. She also authored “Young, Black, and Endangered: Examining the Deaths of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and Tamir Rice Through a Psychological Lens,” a book chapter in Stereotypes and Stereotyping: Misperceptions, Perspectives and Role of Social Media published in 2016. Dr. Dukes serves on the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Diversity and Climate Committee and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues leadership council.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Professor Kristin Dukes, Dean for Institutional Diversity at Allegheny College, USA.
  • Friday 30 October 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

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Fri 04 Dec 16:30: Non-racism and Toxic Interaction Theory in Mental Health Practice: Professional responsibility in the light of systemic racism Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Fri, 09/10/2020 - 21:39
Non-racism and Toxic Interaction Theory in Mental Health Practice: Professional responsibility in the light of systemic racism

This talk will summarise the nature of inequalities for black people in mental health and examine whether the service response is proportionate to the levels of inequality. Additionally, I will highlight ways in which practice does not fully validate the experience of racism in its many forms by using a ‘service-user led’ rationale for not exploring the impact of racisms on black people’s lives; as if the trauma impact and risk can only be considered phenomenologically and does not exist in absolute terms.

Hári is founder and Director of HS Consultancy and is a former executive director of health and social care in the NHS . He has worked as national equalities lead for the National Mental Health Development Unit as part of his consultancy. He regularly runs training days for the NHS , local authorities and voluntary sector organisations and is widely published on the field of equalities. He is Honorary Senior Research Fellow at University of Central Lancashire and is Specialist Guest Lecturer at University of Bradford. Hári is co-founder, and chair of the national Social Care Strategic Network (Mental Health) until November 2010. Hári has had various books, articles and book chapters published, with new material emerging regularly, usually ever year.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

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Fri 27 Nov 16:30: Recent insights into remote fear memory attenuation Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Fri, 09/10/2020 - 21:39
Recent insights into remote fear memory attenuation

Abstract: Fear and traumata generate some of the longest-lived memories, which contribute to the elevated life-time prevalence of stress and anxiety-related disorders. Despite the corresponding need to better understand how such long-lasting fear memories can be attenuated, surprisingly little is known about this process. In this talk, I will present our recent findings that help to better understand remote fear memory attenuation from a circuit and cellular perspective.

Bio: Johannes Gräff is Associate Professor at the Brain Mind Institute of the School of Life Sciences at EPFL , Switzerland. Of Swiss origin, he obtained his PhD under the guidance of Isabelle Mansuy at ETHZ , and conducted his postdoctoral studies in the laboratory of Li-Huei Tsai at the Picower Institute of Learning and Memory at MIT . Since setting up his own research group in 2013, Johannes has become a NARSAD Independent Investigator, an MQ fellow, a Vallee Scholar and a founding member of the FENS -KAVLI Network of Excellence. In 2014, he has received the Young Investigator Award of the Swiss Society for Biological Psychiatry, and in 2020 the Boehringer Ingelheim FENS Research Award.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Professor Johannes Gräff, Associate Professor at the Brain Mind Institute of the School of Life Sciences at EPFL, Switzerland
  • Friday 27 November 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

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Fri 20 Nov 16:30: Old wine in new skins: a fresh look at cognitive control development Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Fri, 09/10/2020 - 21:38
Old wine in new skins: a fresh look at cognitive control development

Abstract: Cognitive control refers to flexible and goal-directed action and it is a hallmark of human cognition. Its development has been predominantly described in terms of quantitative changes. An emerging perspective argues however that children deploy control in qualitatively different ways compared to adults. In this talk I will explore these qualitative differences by focussing on variability, metacognition and plasticity. I will leverage different methodologies (i.e. neuroimaging and computational modelling) to understand mechanisms of change and discuss how we can capitalise this to devise interventions at critical points of impact. Bio: Niko obtained his PhD in 2008 on the neuroscience of music, fittingly from the University of Leipzig. He then switched research fields to do a postdoc in developmental social neuroscience at the University of Zuerich. After becoming senior researcher and then group leader at the Max-Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Niko embarked on research fellowships at Weill Cornell Medical School and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. In 2015 he joined the Department of Developmental Psychology of Leiden University as an Assistant Professor and in 2017 became an Associate Professor at UCL ’s Division of Psychology and Language Sciences. Niko holds several grants, including a Jacobs Fellowship, a Starting Grant from the European Research Council and most recently an ESRC -ORA grant. He has a broad interest in cognitive, social and affective development and he adopts a multimethod approach to address the operation of sensitive periods in childhood.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Dr Nikolaus Steinbeis, Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London
  • Friday 20 November 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

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Fri 13 Nov 16:30: Understanding Fallism Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Fri, 09/10/2020 - 21:38
Understanding Fallism

Abstract: The decolonial turn in South Africa was inspired to a large degree by the student protests of 2015, 2016 and 2017. Rallying around the banner of ‘Fallism,’ a host of student movements demanded that the colonial vestiges of higher education ‘fall.’ Soon enough, Fallism was being invoked as an inspirational force behind popular and student movements in the United States and the United Kingdom. In this seminar, I attempt to make sense of the rise of Fallist movements and explore their implications for the academic establishment.

Bio: Wahbie Long is a clinical psychologist and associate professor in the Department of Psychology and the director of the Child Guidance Clinic at the University of Cape Town. He is widely published on the history, theory and indigenization of psychology.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Professor Wahbie Long, clinical psychologist and associate professor in the Department of Psychology and the director of the Child Guidance Clinic at the University of Cape Town
  • Friday 13 November 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 06 Nov 16:30: Role of medial prefrontal cortex serotonin 2A receptors in recognition memory in rodents Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Fri, 09/10/2020 - 21:38
Role of medial prefrontal cortex serotonin 2A receptors in recognition memory in rodents

Episodic memories contain information about our personal experiences. But memories would be useless if we could not retrieve them. Memory retrieval requires the correct selection of a particular trace to be expressed. However, many memories share cues, so how does the brain control interference between similar memories during retrieval? A system including the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC) has been proposed to mediate response selection and control interference. Over the years we have studied how serotonin and particularly 5-HT2a receptors (5-HT2aR) modulates memory processes. By combining behavioral tasks with pharmacology and genetically modified mice we were able to show that mPFC 5-HT2aR are important for the retrieval of episodic like memories and their reconsolidation, some of the signaling cascade that appears to participate in this modulation and how mPFC 5-HT2aR might help the retrieval of weak memories.

Noelia Weisstaub is a biologist from the Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires, 2 masters followed by PhD from Columbia University in New York (USA) with Dr Rene Hen and Dr Jay Gingrich, where she explored the role of the 5-HT2a receptor in emotional control processes and the action of hallucinogenic drugs. She followed with a postdoc in the Division of Translational Neurosciences of the Psychiatric Institute of New York. She returned to Argentina within the roots program for repatriation of human resources (PRH), first with a reintegration scholarship from CONICET and then as a full independent researcher In 2009 laboratory within the Systems Neuroscience Group at the School of Medicine of the University of Buenos Aires. She co-directs the Molecular Cognition Laboratory. The research lines of the laboratory are intended to understand the cellular and molecular and systems mechanisms of memory and forgetting and the role of the serotonergic system in these processes.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Professor Noelia Weisstaub, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires
  • Friday 06 November 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

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Wed 21 Oct 16:00: How is Human Social Cognition Special? Please note, this talk is combined with the Social Psychology Seminar Series (SPSS)

Fri, 09/10/2020 - 21:37
How is Human Social Cognition Special?

Abstract: Humans cannot claim to be the only social animal. But is there something special about human social cognition? Here we argue that it distinguishes itself by its unique flexibility: In scope, as it can be extended beyond fellow living humans and withheld from them; in content, as it is revised over time, and in certainty; in process, as it follows bayesian inferences based on probability. Further, we posit that both the hyper-sociality of humans and some of its distinctive anthropological manifestations derive from this flexibility. This theoretical approach provides an alternative to content-based accounts of superior and distinctive human social cognition, and challenges the static ‘social-wiring’ hypothesis. Here, I present social neuroscience data consistent with this alternative hypothesis.

Bio:

Dr. Harris completed his undergraduate education at Howard University, USA , and received post-graduate training at Princeton University, USA . He has held positions at New York University, USA , Duke University, USA , and Leiden University, the Netherlands, before coming to UCL . Dr. Harris’ research explores the neural correlates of person perception, prejudice, dehumanization, anthropomorphism, social learning, social emotions, empathy, and punishment. This research addresses questions such as: How do we see people as less than human, and non-human objects as human beings? How do we modulate affective responses to people? How do we decide right from wrong?

Please note, this talk is combined with the Social Psychology Seminar Series (SPSS)

  • Speaker: Professor Lasana Harris, Associate Professor, Experimental Psychology, University College London
  • Wednesday 21 October 2020, 16:00-17:30
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

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Fri 16 Oct 16:30: The case for formal methodology in scientific reform Please note, virtual tea at 4.15pm with talk starting at 4.30pm

Fri, 09/10/2020 - 21:37
The case for formal methodology in scientific reform

Abstract: Current attempts at methodological reform in sciences come in response to an overall lack of rigor in methodological and scientific practices in experimental sciences. However, some of these reform attempts suffer from the same mistakes and over-generalizations they purport to address. Considering the costs of allowing false claims to become canonized, we argue for formal rigor and statistical nuance in methodological reform. By way of example, we present a formal analysis of three popular claims in the metascientific literature: (a) that reproducibility is the cornerstone of science; (b) that data must not be used twice in any analysis; and© that exploratory projects are characterized by poor statistical practice. We show how our formal approach can inform and shape debates about such methodological claims.

Bio: Berna Devezer is an Associate Professor at the Department of Business and Affiliate Faculty at the Department of Mathematics and Statistical Science at the University of Idaho. She received her M.S. in Statistics and PhD in Marketing from Washington State University. Her current research focus is on advancing a theoretical understanding of metascientific phenomena such as scientific progress, reproducibility, and open science.

Please note, virtual tea at 4.15pm with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Dr Berna Devezer, Associate Professor at the Department of Business and Affiliate Faculty at the Department of Mathematics and Statistical Science at the University of Idaho.
  • Friday 16 October 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 30 Oct 16:30: Black Racial Stereotypes and Victim Blaming: Implications for Media Coverage and Criminal Proceedings in Cases of Police Violence against Racial and Ethnic Minorities Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with...

Fri, 09/10/2020 - 21:32
Black Racial Stereotypes and Victim Blaming: Implications for Media Coverage and Criminal Proceedings in Cases of Police Violence against Racial and Ethnic Minorities

This talk will examine how posthumous stereotypical media portrayals of racial and ethnic minority victims of police violence, in particular Black American victims, can influence public opinions about these victims and criminal proceedings for their killers.

Kristin Nicole Dukes, PhD, is the Dean for Institutional Diversity at Allegheny College. In this role she charged with shaping and implementing policies, strategies, and initiatives in support of the Allegheny College’s commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Prior to assuming the senior diversity officer role at Allegheny, Kristin was an Associate Professor of Psychology at Simmons University. Dr. Dukes earned her master’s and doctoral degrees in social psychology from Tufts University with a research focus on stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. She also holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Rice University. Dr. Dukes has published research in various outlets including the Journal of Social Issues and Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy and presented at numerous conferences including the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, and Society of Experimental Social Psychology. Notably, Dr. Dukes edited a 2017 volume of the Journal of Social Issues on police violence against racial/ethnic minorities in a global context titled What Social Science Research Says About Police Violence Against Racial and Ethnic Minorities: Understanding the Antecedents and Consequences. She also authored “Young, Black, and Endangered: Examining the Deaths of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and Tamir Rice Through a Psychological Lens,” a book chapter in Stereotypes and Stereotyping: Misperceptions, Perspectives and Role of Social Media published in 2016. Dr. Dukes serves on the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Diversity and Climate Committee and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues leadership council.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 04 Dec 16:30: Non-racism and Toxic Interaction Theory in Mental Health Practice: Professional responsibility in the light of systemic racism Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Thu, 08/10/2020 - 11:00
Non-racism and Toxic Interaction Theory in Mental Health Practice: Professional responsibility in the light of systemic racism

This talk will summarise the nature of inequalities for black people in mental health and examine whether the service response is proportionate to the levels of inequality. Additionally, I will highlight ways in which practice does not fully validate the experience of racism in its many forms by using a ‘service-user led’ rationale for not exploring the impact of racisms on black people’s lives; as if the trauma impact and risk can only be considered phenomenologically and does not exist in absolute terms.

Hári is founder and Director of HS Consultancy and is a former executive director of health and social care in the NHS . He has worked as national equalities lead for the National Mental Health Development Unit as part of his consultancy. He regularly runs training days for the NHS , local authorities and voluntary sector organisations and is widely published on the field of equalities. He is Honorary Senior Research Fellow at University of Central Lancashire and is Specialist Guest Lecturer at University of Bradford. Hári is co-founder, and chair of the national Social Care Strategic Network (Mental Health) until November 2010. Hári has had various books, articles and book chapters published, with new material emerging regularly, usually ever year.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 30 Oct 16:30: Title to be confirmed Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Thu, 08/10/2020 - 10:29
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 13 Nov 16:30: Understanding Fallism Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Thu, 08/10/2020 - 10:25
Understanding Fallism

Abstract: The decolonial turn in South Africa was inspired to a large degree by the student protests of 2015, 2016 and 2017. Rallying around the banner of ‘Fallism,’ a host of student movements demanded that the colonial vestiges of higher education ‘fall.’ Soon enough, Fallism was being invoked as an inspirational force behind popular and student movements in the United States and the United Kingdom. In this seminar, I attempt to make sense of the rise of Fallist movements and explore their implications for the academic establishment.

Bio: Wahbie Long is a clinical psychologist and associate professor in the Department of Psychology and the director of the Child Guidance Clinic at the University of Cape Town. He is widely published on the history, theory and indigenization of psychology.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Professor Wahbie Long, clinical psychologist and associate professor in the Department of Psychology and the director of the Child Guidance Clinic at the University of Cape Town
  • Friday 13 November 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 20 Nov 16:30: Old wine in new skins: a fresh look at cognitive control development Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Thu, 08/10/2020 - 10:20
Old wine in new skins: a fresh look at cognitive control development

Abstract: Cognitive control refers to flexible and goal-directed action and it is a hallmark of human cognition. Its development has been predominantly described in terms of quantitative changes. An emerging perspective argues however that children deploy control in qualitatively different ways compared to adults. In this talk I will explore these qualitative differences by focussing on variability, metacognition and plasticity. I will leverage different methodologies (i.e. neuroimaging and computational modelling) to understand mechanisms of change and discuss how we can capitalise this to devise interventions at critical points of impact. Bio: Niko obtained his PhD in 2008 on the neuroscience of music, fittingly from the University of Leipzig. He then switched research fields to do a postdoc in developmental social neuroscience at the University of Zuerich. After becoming senior researcher and then group leader at the Max-Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Niko embarked on research fellowships at Weill Cornell Medical School and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. In 2015 he joined the Department of Developmental Psychology of Leiden University as an Assistant Professor and in 2017 became an Associate Professor at UCL ’s Division of Psychology and Language Sciences. Niko holds several grants, including a Jacobs Fellowship, a Starting Grant from the European Research Council and most recently an ESRC -ORA grant. He has a broad interest in cognitive, social and affective development and he adopts a multimethod approach to address the operation of sensitive periods in childhood.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Dr Nikolaus Steinbeis, Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London
  • Friday 20 November 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 23 Oct 16:30: Title to be confirmed Please note, there is no Zangwill talk taking place today, due to the SPSS combined talk on 21st October

Thu, 08/10/2020 - 09:41
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

Please note, there is no Zangwill talk taking place today, due to the SPSS combined talk on 21st October

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 27 Nov 16:30: Recent insights into remote fear memory attenuation Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Thu, 08/10/2020 - 09:39
Recent insights into remote fear memory attenuation

Abstract: Fear and traumata generate some of the longest-lived memories, which contribute to the elevated life-time prevalence of stress and anxiety-related disorders. Despite the corresponding need to better understand how such long-lasting fear memories can be attenuated, surprisingly little is known about this process. In this talk, I will present our recent findings that help to better understand remote fear memory attenuation from a circuit and cellular perspective.

Bio: Johannes Gräff is Associate Professor at the Brain Mind Institute of the School of Life Sciences at EPFL , Switzerland. Of Swiss origin, he obtained his PhD under the guidance of Isabelle Mansuy at ETHZ , and conducted his postdoctoral studies in the laboratory of Li-Huei Tsai at the Picower Institute of Learning and Memory at MIT . Since setting up his own research group in 2013, Johannes has become a NARSAD Independent Investigator, an MQ fellow, a Vallee Scholar and a founding member of the FENS -KAVLI Network of Excellence. In 2014, he has received the Young Investigator Award of the Swiss Society for Biological Psychiatry, and in 2020 the Boehringer Ingelheim FENS Research Award.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Professor Johannes Gräff, Associate Professor at the Brain Mind Institute of the School of Life Sciences at EPFL, Switzerland
  • Friday 27 November 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 06 Nov 16:30: Role of medial prefrontal cortex serotonin 2A receptors in recognition memory in rodents Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Thu, 08/10/2020 - 09:24
Role of medial prefrontal cortex serotonin 2A receptors in recognition memory in rodents

Episodic memories contain information about our personal experiences. But memories would be useless if we could not retrieve them. Memory retrieval requires the correct selection of a particular trace to be expressed. However, many memories share cues, so how does the brain control interference between similar memories during retrieval? A system including the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC) has been proposed to mediate response selection and control interference. Over the years we have studied how serotonin and particularly 5-HT2a receptors (5-HT2aR) modulates memory processes. By combining behavioral tasks with pharmacology and genetically modified mice we were able to show that mPFC 5-HT2aR are important for the retrieval of episodic like memories and their reconsolidation, some of the signaling cascade that appears to participate in this modulation and how mPFC 5-HT2aR might help the retrieval of weak memories.

Noelia Weisstaub is a biologist from the Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires, 2 masters followed by PhD from Columbia University in New York (USA) with Dr Rene Hen and Dr Jay Gingrich, where she explored the role of the 5-HT2a receptor in emotional control processes and the action of hallucinogenic drugs. She followed with a postdoc in the Division of Translational Neurosciences of the Psychiatric Institute of New York. She returned to Argentina within the roots program for repatriation of human resources (PRH), first with a reintegration scholarship from CONICET and then as a full independent researcher In 2009 laboratory within the Systems Neuroscience Group at the School of Medicine of the University of Buenos Aires. She co-directs the Molecular Cognition Laboratory. The research lines of the laboratory are intended to understand the cellular and molecular and systems mechanisms of memory and forgetting and the role of the serotonergic system in these processes.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Professor Noelia Weisstaub, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires
  • Friday 06 November 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list