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This list is intended to include all talks and seminars taking place in the Department of Psychology and certain related institutions.
Updated: 15 min 23 sec ago

Fri 05 Jun 16:30: Psychedelic Relationship Enhancement Topic: Zangwill Zoom Meeting _Brian Earp Time: Jun 5, 2020 04:00 PM London 4-430pm social with Brian pre-Zangwill 430 to 6pm Talk + discussion.

Mon, 01/06/2020 - 12:32
Psychedelic Relationship Enhancement

Abstract

There is now a flurry of research on drug-assisted psychotherapy—focused on MDMA and psilocybin (from magic mushrooms)—for serious mental conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current model treats these drugs as “medicine” and thus conceptually tied to the treating of diseases/disorders. But psychedelic drugs have also been used for “enhancement” purposes, and not only for individual-level concerns but also in relational and community-oriented contexts. What are the ethics of using MDMA or psilocybin for relationship enhancement in “healthy” couples?

Bio

Brian is co-author of the book Love Drugs: The Chemical Future of Relationships (Stanford University Press, 2020; published in the UK by Manchester University Press as Love Is the Drug: The Chemical Future of Our Relationships). The book calls for a “relational turn” in research on the therapeutic effects of MDMA and psychedelic drugs including psilocybin, asking how drug-assisted psychotherapy could benefit couples. Brian is Associate Director of the Yale-Hastings Program in Ethics and Health Policy at Yale University and The Hastings Center, and a Research Fellow in the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford. His work is cross-disciplinary, following training in philosophy, cognitive science, psychology, history and sociology of science and medicine, and ethics. Brian is co-recipient of the 2018 Daniel M. Wegner Theoretical Innovation Prize from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. He is also recipient of both the Robert G. Crowder Prize in Psychology and the Ledyard Cogswell Award for Citizenship from Yale University, where he was elected President of the Yale Philosophy Society as an undergraduate as well as Editor-in-Chief of the Yale Philosophy Review. He then conducted graduate research in psychological methods as a Henry Fellow of New College at the University of Oxford. He also conducted graduate research in the history, philosophy, and sociology of science, technology, and medicine as a Cambridge Trust Scholar and Rausing Award recipient at Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. After spending a year in residence as the inaugural Presidential Scholar in Bioethics at The Hastings Center in Garrison, New York, Brian is now a Benjamin Franklin Resident Graduate Fellow at Yale University, where he is finishing his Ph.D. in philosophy and psychology, having been jointly admitted to both departments. His essays have been translated into Polish, German, Italian, Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Hebrew.

Topic: Zangwill Zoom Meeting _Brian Earp Time: Jun 5, 2020 04:00 PM London 4-430pm social with Brian pre-Zangwill 430 to 6pm Talk + discussion.

  • Speaker: Brian D. Earp, Associate Director of the Yale-Hastings Program in Ethics and Health Policy at Yale University and The Hastings Center, arch Fellow in the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford.
  • Friday 05 June 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

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Thu 18 Jun 12:30: Symptoms of the Schizophrenia Treatment chair: Dr HIsham Ziauddeen

Thu, 28/05/2020 - 15:35
Symptoms of the Schizophrenia Treatment

Schizophrenia is defined by psychosis but also presents a range of other non-psychotic phenomena including behavioural, physical and mental symptoms. Medication is effective for psychosis but might also cause, unmask or worsen phenomena that resemble schizophrenia’s non-psychotic symptoms. After decades of antipsychotic treatment, distinguishing between the primary and secondary phenomena is crucial for patient’s effective treatment and might also help in our understanding of the illness itself. Here, I will explain our recent work on the description, understanding and management of some of the antipsychotic-induced symptoms.

chair: Dr HIsham Ziauddeen

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Fri 29 May 16:30: The role of the anterior temporal lobe in semantic representation and its disorders

Tue, 26/05/2020 - 09:38
The role of the anterior temporal lobe in semantic representation and its disorders

Although not found in classical neurological models of language, the role of the anterior temporal lobe in semantic representation has been increasingly recognised over the past 25 years. Here, I will summarise some of the accumulation of evidence, derived from multiple neuropsychological and neuroscience methods and share some of the contemporary data that continues to provide new insights about the potential dynamic computations of the anterior temporal lobe.

Bio

I obtained my PhD from York University and then worked at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit (Cambridge). I moved from there to the University of Bristol, Department of Experimental Psychology, as a Lecturer. I went to Manchester in 2001 as Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience within the School of Psychological Sciences, where I also became Associate Vice-President (Research) and Director of the Manchester Doctoral College. In 2018, I had the honour of being appointed as the Director of the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.

I am an action editor for Neurobiology of Language, and Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. I am on the editorial boards for Cognitive Neuropsychology, Memory, International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy, Psychologia, and Neurocase. I was the President of The British Neuropsychological Society (2010-12) and the Vice-Chair for the British Aphasiology Society (2000-2005). I was made a Fellow (hons) of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists in 2003, Fellow of the British Psychological Society in 2012, Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and Fellow of the British Academy in 2019. I am also Honorary Research Professor of the University of Málaga in 2014 and a Senior Investigator Emeritus for the NIHR . I was awarded the BPS President’s Award in 2015, the Barbara Newcombe (mid-career) Prize by the British Neuropsychological Society in 2016, the Mid-Career Award by the British Association for Cognitive Neuroscience in 2016, and the 17th Mid-Career Award by the Experimental Psychology Society in 2018. I was chair of the EU Human Brain Project Stakeholder Board (the principal oversight committee) from 2016 to 2019.”

  • Speaker: Professor Matt Lambon Ralph, Unit Director, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge
  • Friday 29 May 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

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Thu 28 May 12:30: A Computational Approach to Understanding Motivational Symptoms in Depression chair: Dr Graham Murray

Mon, 25/05/2020 - 07:36
A Computational Approach to Understanding Motivational Symptoms in Depression

Abstract not available

chair: Dr Graham Murray

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Thu 18 Jun 12:30: The common link between schizophrenia and diabetes chair: Dr HIsham Ziauddeen

Mon, 25/05/2020 - 07:31
The common link between schizophrenia and diabetes

Abstract not available

chair: Dr HIsham Ziauddeen

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Fri 29 May 16:30: The role of the anterior temporal lobe in semantic representation and its disorders

Fri, 22/05/2020 - 11:03
The role of the anterior temporal lobe in semantic representation and its disorders

Although not found in classical neurological models of language, the role of the anterior temporal lobe in semantic representation has been increasingly recognised over the past 25 years. Here, I will summarise some of the accumulation of evidence, derived from multiple neuropsychological and neuroscience methods and share some of the contemporary data that continues to provide new insights about the potential dynamic computations of the anterior temporal lobe.

Bio: I obtained my PhD from York University and then worked at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit (Cambridge). I moved from there to the University of Bristol, Department of Experimental Psychology, as a Lecturer. I came to Manchester in 2001 as Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience within the School of Psychological Sciences. I am also Associate Vice-President (Research) and Director of the Manchester Doctoral College at the University. I am an Action Editor for Neuropsychological Rehabilitation and on the editorial boards for Cognitive Neuropsychology, Memory, International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy, Psychologia, and Neurocase. I was the President of The British Neuropsychological society (2010-12) and the Vice-Chair for the British Aphasiology Society (2000-2005). I was made a Fellow (hons) of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists in 2003, Fellow of the British Psychological Society in 2012 and an Honorary Research Professor of the University of Málaga in 2014. I am also a Senior Investigator Emeritus for the NIHR . I was awarded the BPS President’s Award in 2015, the Barbara Newcombe (mid-career) Prize by the British Neuropsychological Society in 2016, the Mid-Career Award by the British Association for Cognitive Neuroscience in 2016, and the 17th Mid-Career Award by the Experimental Psychology Society in 2018. I am currently MRC -CBU Director.

  • Speaker: Professor Matt Lambon Ralph, Unit Director, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge
  • Friday 29 May 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

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Thu 04 Jun 12:30: The Truth about Suicide: the effect the death of a patient by suicide has on the clinician chair: Dr Judy Rubinsztein

Thu, 21/05/2020 - 11:43
The Truth about Suicide: the effect the death of a patient by suicide has on the clinician

Suicide is something that is at the back of our minds in a lot of our work with patients. Given its importance and the fear that it generates, it is surprising that there is very little known about its nature or aetiology. This talk aims to confront the ‘Truth’ about suicide. It will look at the psychoanalytic understanding of suicidal states of mind and test this by looking at real cases. What leads someone to take their own life? Can it be prevented? The profound effect the suicide of a patient has on the clinician working with them will be discussed. Knowledge gained about how to process and work with this trauma will be shared.

chair: Dr Judy Rubinsztein

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Thu 09 Jul 12:30: Sleep and Mental Health: better nights for better days chair: Dr Muzaffer Kaser

Thu, 21/05/2020 - 11:09
Sleep and Mental Health: better nights for better days

Abstract not available

chair: Dr Muzaffer Kaser

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Thu 04 Jun 12:30: 'My Fatal Mistake': Guilt, blame and the role of the clinician in a patient suicide chair: Dr Judy Rubinsztein

Thu, 21/05/2020 - 10:57
'My Fatal Mistake': Guilt, blame and the role of the clinician in a patient suicide

Suicide is something that is at the back of our minds in a lot of our work with patients. Given its importance and the fear that it generates, it is surprising that there is very little known about its nature or aetiology. This talk aims to confront the ‘Truth’ about suicide. It will look at the psychoanalytic understanding of suicidal states of mind and test this by looking at real cases. What leads someone to take their own life? Can it be prevented? The profound effect the suicide of a patient has on the clinician working with them will be discussed. Knowledge gained about how to process and work with this trauma will be shared.

chair: Dr Judy Rubinsztein

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Thu 17 Sep 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Tue, 19/05/2020 - 14:06
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

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Fri 22 May 13:30: Fragile Memories for Fleeting Percepts We will have a Tea and coffee informal gathering from 1pm to 1.30pm and the talk will start at 130.pm followed by questions and discussion at 230pm.

Mon, 18/05/2020 - 15:57
Fragile Memories for Fleeting Percepts

The Simultaneous Type/ Serial Token (STST) model of temporal attention and working memory (Bowman & Wyble, 2007) was published over 10 years ago as a theory of the attentional blink and associated phenomena. In the intervening period, the scope of the theory has grown, becoming a theory of the episodic nature of attention and perception (Wyble et al, 2011). Recently, we have also been considering the implications of the STST model for theories of conscious perception. If one interprets the neural network model that implements the STST theory literally, it makes two particular predictions for conscious experience: 1) that we can pre-consciously search our sensory environments for salient stimuli (type-information); and 2) that we cannot pre-consciously search our sensory environment on the basis of episodic information (token-information). The latter of these fits well with theories of conscious perception based upon event individuation (Kanwisher, 2001). Using rapid serial visual presentation, I will report a series of EEG (Bowman et al, 2014) and behavioural (Aviles et al, 2020) experiments that provide evidence in support of these two predictions. These experiments focus on the fragility, even absence, of memory for fleetingly presented stimuli. We argue that these findings provide support for a theory we call the tokenised percept hypothesis.

Avilés, A., Bowman, H., & Wyble, B. (2020). On the limits of evidence accumulation of the preconscious percept. Cognition, 195, 104080.

Bowman, H., & Wyble, B. (2007). The simultaneous type, serial token model of temporal attention and working memory. Psychological review, 114(1), 38.

Bowman, H., Filetti, M., Alsufyani, A., Janssen, D., & Su, L. (2014). Countering countermeasures: detecting identity lies by detecting conscious breakthrough. PloS one, 9(3).

Kanwisher, N. (2001). Neural events and perceptual awareness. Cognition, 79(1-2), 89-113. Wyble, B., Potter, M. C., Bowman, H., & Nieuwenstein, M. (2011). Attentional episodes in visual perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 140(3), 488.

We will have a Tea and coffee informal gathering from 1pm to 1.30pm and the talk will start at 130.pm followed by questions and discussion at 230pm.

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Thu 11 Jun 12:30: Integrating physical and mental health care in children's services chair: Prof Tamsin Ford

Wed, 13/05/2020 - 12:53
Integrating physical and mental health care in children's services

Abstract not available

chair: Prof Tamsin Ford

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Thu 25 Jun 12:30: Smoking cessation in mental health services: from rhetoric to reality chair: Dr Emilio Fernandez-Egea

Tue, 12/05/2020 - 15:45
Smoking cessation in mental health services: from rhetoric to reality

Abstract not available

chair: Dr Emilio Fernandez-Egea

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Tue 19 May 13:00: Neurodevelopment in global contexts: early brain markers of memory development from infant cohorts in the UK and The Gambia To access this Zoom talk please email Kate Shaw (ks723@cam.ac.uk) so that she can send you the meeting access...

Tue, 12/05/2020 - 15:00
Neurodevelopment in global contexts: early brain markers of memory development from infant cohorts in the UK and The Gambia

Infants and children in low- and middle-income countries are frequently exposed to a range of poverty-related risk factors, increasing their likelihood of poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. There is a need for culturally objective markers, which can be used to study infants from birth, thereby enabling early identification and ultimately intervention during a critical time of neurodevelopment. In this talk, findings on early memory development will be presented, obtained in infant cohorts in the UK and The Gambia, West Africa. These data were collected as part of the Brain Imaging for Global Health (BRIGHT) project, which longitudinally assesses infants in these two settings from birth to two years of age. Our findings indicate that on group level, both habituation and novelty responses are reduced in the Gambian cohort, however with substantial interindividual variance. Individual differences were further associated with infants’ neurobehavioural scores.

To access this Zoom talk please email Kate Shaw (ks723@cam.ac.uk) so that she can send you the meeting access ID and password.

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Thu 21 May 12:30: Minimal clinically important differences: a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine chair: Prof Tim Dalgleish

Tue, 12/05/2020 - 11:41
Minimal clinically important differences: a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine

Abstract not available

chair: Prof Tim Dalgleish

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Thu 14 May 12:30: Role of Inflammation in Depression: exciting therapeutic opportunity or fake news? chair: Dr Graham Murray

Mon, 11/05/2020 - 15:54
Role of Inflammation in Depression: exciting therapeutic opportunity or fake news?

The immune system, particularly low-grade systemic inflammation, has been implicated in pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. Inflammation is thought to be a clinically relevant phenotype, as evidenced by three widely replicated findings: (1) concentrations of acute phase proteins (e.g. C-reactive protein or CRP ) and inflammatory cytokines (e.g. interleukin 6 or IL-6) are elevated during acute depression; (2) these elevated levels tend to normalise after recovery; (3) patients with treatment resistant depression continue to display evidence of low-grade inflammation. Currently, a number of RCTs are testing the efficacy of novel anti-inflammatory drugs for patients with depression. However, there are key unanswered questions both mechanistic and clinical. Is inflammation a causal risk factor for depression? Because, elevated inflammatory markers could be a result of illness/associated stress (i.e. reverse causality) or confounding by life style and other known/unknown factors. What are the features of immune-related depression? Could anti-inflammatory treatment be used to treat depressive symptoms? If so, which patients are likely to benefit? How does peripheral inflammation communicate with the brain to influence mood, cognition and behaviour? Dr Khandaker will present current evidence on these issues. He will discuss evidence from population-based studies and Mendelian randomization genetic analysis suggesting that reverse causality and residual confounding are unlikely to fully explain previously reported associations of depression with IL-6, CRP , and that the IL-6/IL-6R pathway could be causally linked with depression. He will present data from systematic reviews and meta-analysis on the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs, including monoclonal antibodies (mAb), on depressive symptoms. These studies have informed an ongoing proof-of-concept double blind RCT of tocilizumab (anti-IL-6R mAb) for patients with depression, the Insight study (ISRCTN16942542), which will be discussed.

chair: Dr Graham Murray

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Fri 15 May 16:00: The role of the ventral pallidum and globus pallidus in motivation and outcome evaluation

Mon, 11/05/2020 - 14:42
The role of the ventral pallidum and globus pallidus in motivation and outcome evaluation

The Zangwill Club continues online in these turbulent times with the second talk of the Term via Zoom.

This Friday 15th of May at 4 pm Greenwich Time we will have the Second Zangwill Lockdown Talk by Dr Marcus Stephenson-Jones

Title: "The role of the ventral pallidum and globus pallidus in motivation and outcome evaluation."

” The basal ganglia play a critical role in reinforcement learning but while a lot is known about the mechanisms for learning, comparatively little is known about what is being learnt in these nuclei. To address this our lab is interested in understanding what different populations of basal ganglia output nuclei encode and determining how they contribute to behaviour. In this talk I will present our recent findings that characterized two output nuclei, the ventral pallidum and the habenula-projecting globus pallidus. I’ll show that the activity of separate populations of neurons in the ventral pallidum are correlated with incentive and aversive salience and these populations drive motivated behaviour. In contrast, I’ll show neurons in the habenula-projecting globus pallidus encode reward prediction errors and are critical for evaluating action outcomes. “

The Zangwill Club will start at 4pm with an afternoon coffee or tea (virtually served) and split between 2 rooms, the “Talk to Marcus Room” and the “social have a cuppa room”. At 4.30pm we will start the Talk (one Hour) followed by 20-30 minutes of questions as usual.

Mini Bio, Dr Marcus Stephenson-Jones

PhD with Sten Grillner at the Karolinska institute in Sweden, studied the evolution of the basal ganglia

Postdoc with Bo Li at Cold Spring harbor, investigated the role of the basal ganglia in motivation and evaluating action outcomes.

Group leader at the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre, studying reinforcement learning mechanisms in the basal ganglia.

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