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This list is intended to include all talks and seminars taking place in the Department of Psychology and certain related institutions.
Updated: 8 min 8 sec ago

Thu 03 Dec 12:30: CANCELLED (Rescheduled for 18th February 2021) - Towards better interoceptive biomarkers in computational psychiatry chair: Dr Valerie Voon

Wed, 02/12/2020 - 16:42
CANCELLED (Rescheduled for 18th February 2021) - Towards better interoceptive biomarkers in computational psychiatry

Empirical evidence and theoretical models both increasingly emphasize the importance of interoceptive processing in mental health. Indeed, many mood and psychiatric disorders involve disturbances of feelings and/or beliefs about the visceral body. However, current methods to measure interoceptive ability are limited in a number of ways, limiting the utility and interpretation of interoceptive biomarkers in psychiatry. I will present some newly developed measures and models which aim to improve our understanding of disordered brain-body interaction in psychiatric illnesses.

chair: Dr Valerie Voon

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Wed 02 Dec 16:00: The Social and Political Implications of Moral Conviction

Tue, 01/12/2020 - 09:53
The Social and Political Implications of Moral Conviction

Scholars often assume that some issues globally evoke moral reactions, whether these issues are presented as moral dilemmas (e.g., trolley problems) or as controversial issues of the day (e.g., the legal status of abortion). There is considerable individual variation, however, in the degree that people report that their position on specific issues reflects their core moral convictions. Moreover, the degree to which people experience an attitude as a moral conviction has important social and political consequences, such as predicting increased political engagement (voting, activism, volunteerism), inoculation against the usual pressures to obey authorities and the law, resistance to majority influence, unwillingness to compromise, and greater acceptance of violent solutions to conflict. The normative implications of these and other findings are both reassuring (moral convictions can protect against obedience to potentially malevolent authorities) and terrifying (moral convictions are associated with rejection of the rule of law and can provide a motivational foundation for violent protest and acts of terrorism). Implications and directions for future research will be discussed.

Professor Skitka is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Zoom link: https://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/study/grads/grads/spss-joining-details

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Thu 03 Dec 12:30: Towards better interoceptive biomarkers in computational psychiatry chair: Dr Valerie Voon

Mon, 30/11/2020 - 16:58
Towards better interoceptive biomarkers in computational psychiatry

Empirical evidence and theoretical models both increasingly emphasize the importance of interoceptive processing in mental health. Indeed, many mood and psychiatric disorders involve disturbances of feelings and/or beliefs about the visceral body. However, current methods to measure interoceptive ability are limited in a number of ways, limiting the utility and interpretation of interoceptive biomarkers in psychiatry. I will present some newly developed measures and models which aim to improve our understanding of disordered brain-body interaction in psychiatric illnesses.

chair: Dr Valerie Voon

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Fri 11 Dec 16:30: [NEW DATE:11th of December] Old wine in new skins: a fresh look at cognitive control development Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

Thu, 19/11/2020 - 14:10
[NEW DATE:11th of December] Old wine in new skins: a fresh look at cognitive control development

Abstract: Cognitive control refers to flexible and goal-directed action and it is a hallmark of human cognition. Its development has been predominantly described in terms of quantitative changes. An emerging perspective argues however that children deploy control in qualitatively different ways compared to adults. In this talk I will explore these qualitative differences by focussing on variability, metacognition and plasticity. I will leverage different methodologies (i.e. neuroimaging and computational modelling) to understand mechanisms of change and discuss how we can capitalise this to devise interventions at critical points of impact. Bio: Niko obtained his PhD in 2008 on the neuroscience of music, fittingly from the University of Leipzig. He then switched research fields to do a postdoc in developmental social neuroscience at the University of Zuerich. After becoming senior researcher and then group leader at the Max-Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Niko embarked on research fellowships at Weill Cornell Medical School and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. In 2015 he joined the Department of Developmental Psychology of Leiden University as an Assistant Professor and in 2017 became an Associate Professor at UCL ’s Division of Psychology and Language Sciences. Niko holds several grants, including a Jacobs Fellowship, a Starting Grant from the European Research Council and most recently an ESRC -ORA grant. He has a broad interest in cognitive, social and affective development and he adopts a multimethod approach to address the operation of sensitive periods in childhood.

Please note, this talk will start at 4.15pm for virtual tea with talk starting at 4.30pm

  • Speaker: Dr Nikolaus Steinbeis, Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London
  • Friday 11 December 2020, 16:30-18:00
  • Venue: Zoom meeting.
  • Series: Zangwill Club; organiser: Louise White.

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Wed 18 Nov 16:00: How to talk about your feelings: The peculiar relationship between words and emotions

Tue, 17/11/2020 - 14:02
How to talk about your feelings: The peculiar relationship between words and emotions

In today’s age of hyper-self-awareness, the ability to label our emotions is often celebrated. Self-styled emotion experts publish lengthy lists of emotion words to help people articulate feelings as precisely as possible, and it is often assumed that people who use rich emotional vocabularies are emotionally and physically healthier than those who do not. However, the science behind our emotional experiences and our verbal behaviour is still in its infancy, and our research suggests that the current wisdom on emotion labeling doesn’t give us the full picture.

Dr Boyd is a Lecturer in Behavioural Analytics at the University of Lancaster.

Zoom link: https://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/study/grads/grads/spss-joining-details

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Thu 19 Nov 12:30: Alcohol and Older People. What's the Use? chair: Prof John O'Brien

Mon, 16/11/2020 - 11:39
Alcohol and Older People. What's the Use?

Abstract not available

chair: Prof John O'Brien

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Thu 03 Dec 12:30: Embodied Cognition

Mon, 16/11/2020 - 11:39
Embodied Cognition

Abstract not available

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Thu 28 Jan 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Mon, 16/11/2020 - 11:39
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

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Thu 18 Mar 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Mon, 16/11/2020 - 11:39
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

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