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Dr William Skylark

Dr William Skylark

University Senior Lecturer

William Skylark is accepting applications for PhD students.

Dept of Psychology
Downing Street
Cambridge
CB2 3EB

Office Phone: +44 (0)1223 (3)33572

Biography:

My work concerns human communication and choice -- that is, how people form and communicate beliefs about the world, and how they choose between different options and courses of action.

I studied Natural Science at Cambridge, specializing in Zoology. I then stayed on to take the final year course in Psychology, followed by a PhD on decision processes in picture recognition, supervised by Donald Laming.

In 2005-2006 I held a teaching job at the University of Leciester and from 2006-2009 I was a Research Fellow at the University of Warwick, working with Neil Stewart. From 2009-2014 I was a Lecturer and then Senior Lecturer at the University of Essex.

I joined the University of Cambridge as a Senior Lecturer in September 2014.

Research Interests

Human communication and choice behaviour

Keywords

  • perception
  • psychology
  • judgments
  • cognition
  • decision making

Key Publications

(Please note: my surname changed from Matthews in late 2016)

Gheorghiu, A.I., Callan, M.J., & Skylark, W.J. (2017). Facial appearance affects science communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114, 5970-5975. Open access.

Farmer, G.D., Baron-Cohen, S., & Skylark, W.J. (2017). People with Autism Spectrum Conditions make more consistent decisions. Psychological Science, 28, 1067-1076. Open access.

Matthews, W.J., & Meck, W.H. (2016). Temporal cognition: Connecting subjective time to perception, attention, and memory. Psychological Bulletin, 142(8), 865-907. link to paper

Matthews, W.J., & Dylman, A.S. (2014). The language of magnitude comparison. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143, 510-520. link to paper

Matthews, W.J. (2015). Time perception: The surprising effects of surprising stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 144, 172-197.  link to paper

Matthews, W.J. (2013). How does sequence structure affect the judgment of time?  Exploring a weighted sum of segments model. Cognitive Psychology, 66, 259-282. link to paper