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Prospective Graduates

Introduction to Graduate Courses

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The Department admits graduates to study for research degrees. These include the PhD, an MPhil in Biological Science, and an MPhil in Social and Developmental Psychology. The answers to most of your questions should be found on these pages, or on the University's central Graduate Admissions pages, but candidates with additional questions are invited to contact the Department's  (graduateoffice@psychol.cam.ac.uk).

There is a strong and lively graduate community in the Department, with dedicated study areas, online forums, and support available from academic and administrative staff. Over 100 PhD students and 20 MPhil students study at any one time and regular programmes of graduate and staff seminars are held both within the Faculty and in related faculties throughout the academic year.

The academic staff of the Department of Psychology are, both collectively and individually, world-class leaders in the field. Students are encouraged to work on projects and follow topics that are at the cutting edge of new research and policy initiatives.

PhD (Course Code BLPC22)

A three-year, full-time research degree (a part-time option is available). Candidates carry out an original piece of research and submit a 60,000 word dissertation.

MPhil in Biological Sciences by Research (Course Code BLPCM1)

A one-year, full-time research degree, culminating in the production of a 20,000 word dissertation detailing a piece of original research and its conclusions. This degree can also be studied on a part-time basis.

MPhil in Social and Developmental Psychology (Course Code BLPCM2)

The Department offers a nine-month Master of Philosophy programme (MPhil) in Social and Developmental Psychology, which includes a range of taught elements and a research dissertation. It is not necessary to complete this MPhil in order to apply to a PhD, but it does provide an excellent grounding in the research skills needed to succeed at PhD level and each year some students progress from the MPhil to the PhD. Other students use the skills acquired to succeed in careers such as health and social care, marketing and public relations, and education.

Other relevant departments

Please contact the following Departments directly if you are interested in their particular areas of research:

Research in neuropsychiatry (e.g., depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and drug addiction) is carried out in the Department of Psychiatry and within the Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute.

Research in several areas of human cognitive neuroscience is also carried out at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.

Research on ethology and comparative psychology is carried out at the Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour.

Please note that the Department does not offer the following:

  • Degrees/programmes/courses/training in clinical, counselling, educational, health or sports and exercise psychology
  • Distance learning degrees/programmes/courses/training
  • Exclusively taught postgraduate degrees
  • Psychology conversion courses

PhD (Course Code BLPC22)

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The PhD degree is a minimum of three years of full-time research with an individual supervisor followed by examination of a research thesis in an oral examination. This is the principal research degree offered in the Department of Psychology and the great majority of our students are registered for this degree.

At the end of their first year of study students are required to complete a satisfactory First Year Report and Viva. A brief report (without viva) is required at the end of the second year and third year.

All candidates are expected to take part in the Department’s Graduate Education Programme and the Graduate School of Life Science’s Skills Training Programme.

Applications are usually considered in one round - for October entry. This allows applicants to compete for funding and to attend the Graduate Induction events held at the beginning of the academic year.

In some circumstances, it is possible to defer entry to Lent or Easter terms, or apply for a January or April start date. However, applicants should contact the Graduate Administrator in advance of submitting their application to discuss whether this option would be available to them.

Academic requirements

Candidates who wish to become research students in the Department should usually have a good degree in psychology, neuroscience or in another related subject (for example, physiology, sociology, linguistics, computer science, or engineering), which may provide sufficient background for research in certain areas of psychology, behavioural or cognitive behavioural neuroscience or social and developmental psychology.  Experience and/or training in psychology is not always a requirement, but may be advantageous for some research projects.

Graduate work in Cambridge is intense and very intellectually demanding and so the University has high academic entry requirements. You are normally expected to hold or to be about to achieve:

•           at least a 2.I honours degree from a UK university

•           an equivalent standard from an overseas university (On a 4-point GPA, we require a minimum of 3.5 out of 4)

•           a fluent command of the English language

•           completion of any current training or education course

You are not required to provide GRE scores.

Testimonial

Coming to Cambridge from the U.S., where science PhDs can take up to seven years, I knew I would have the advantage of an accelerated program. Now looking back on the last two years, I realise just how many opportunities have been open to me that wouldn’t have been available elsewhere.

At Cambridge you hit the ground running, thrown into the research process within your first few weeks. As there is no traditional coursework required, the focus is really on learning by doing. At times this can seem overwhelming, but once inspiration strikes every opportunity is provided to help make your project ideas come to fruition. That’s not to say that the accelerated pace is without its challenges. If you are unsure about your dissertation topic or require a bit more guidance it can be daunting to be in such a self-directed setting without the structure, classes or deadlines of a more typical PhD program. However, the flexibility that Cambridge provides and the opportunities available to students are unmatched, and the collective knowledge and expertise of other members of the department are truly without parallel.

One of the main advantages I’ve found at Cambridge is the collaborative nature that exists between labs and disciplines. The lines between psychology, psychiatry and neuroscience are blurred, and journal clubs, weekly seminars and visiting lecturers help bring the departments together, fostering the feeling of a wider scientific community and engendering discussion and collaboration. This cooperative environment helped encourage me to go beyond the original scope of my PhD and to set up an independent side project outside the immediate focus of my lab, which wouldn’t have been otherwise feasible.The thing that has always struck me most about Cambridge, though, is the passion that everyone brings to their work. Whether it’s seeking advice from professors in the department or chatting with your fellow graduate students at college, the enthusiasm with which everyone speaks about their research is infectious. The atmosphere is one of intellectual excitement and curiosity, and it is this aspect of Cambridge that I find most compelling and inspiring.

Dana Smith, PhD student in the Department, supported by the Cambridge Overseas Trust

FAQs

Find the answers to frequently asked questions.

MPhil in Biological Sciences by Research (Course Code BLPCM1)

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The MPhil is one year of full-time research with an individual supervisor followed by examination of a research thesis in an oral examination.

The MPhil is most commonly taken as a stand-alone research degree by candidates with only one year of funding. If this course is taken as part of a route to the PhD a further three years of study and funding are required as well as satisfactory performance in the MPhil. The PhD project may draw on the topic of the MPhil, but the same work cannot be presented for both degrees.

All candidates are expected to take part in the Department’s Graduate Education Programme and the Graduate School of Life Science’s Skills Training Programme

Applications are usually considered in one round - for October entry. This allows applicants to compete for funding and to attend the Graduate Induction events held at the beginning of the academic year.

In some circumstances, it is possible to defer entry to Lent or Easter terms, or apply for a January or April start date. However, applicants should contact the Graduate Administrator in advance of submitting their application to discuss whether this option would be available to them.

Academic requirements

Candidates who wish to become research students in the Department should usually have a good degree in psychology, neuroscience or in another related subject (for example, physiology, sociology, linguistics, computer science, or engineering), which may provide sufficient background for research in certain areas of psychology, behavioural or cognitive behavioural neuroscience or social and developmental psychology.  Experience and/or training in psychology is not always a requirement, but may be advantageous for some research projects.

Graduate work in Cambridge is intense and very intellectually demanding and so the University has high academic entry requirements. You are normally expected to hold or to be about to achieve:

•           at least a 2.I honours degree from a UK university

•           an equivalent standard from an overseas university (On a 4-point GPA, we require a minimum of 3.5 out of 4)

•           a fluent command of the English language

•           completion of any current training or education course

You are not required to provide GRE scores.

Testimonial

Coming to Cambridge from the U.S., where science PhDs can take up to seven years, I knew I would have the advantage of an accelerated program. Now looking back on the last two years, I realise just how many opportunities have been open to me that wouldn’t have been available elsewhere.

At Cambridge you hit the ground running, thrown into the research process within your first few weeks. As there is no traditional coursework required, the focus is really on learning by doing. At times this can seem overwhelming, but once inspiration strikes every opportunity is provided to help make your project ideas come to fruition. That’s not to say that the accelerated pace is without its challenges. If you are unsure about your dissertation topic or require a bit more guidance it can be daunting to be in such a self-directed setting without the structure, classes or deadlines of a more typical PhD program. However, the flexibility that Cambridge provides and the opportunities available to students are unmatched, and the collective knowledge and expertise of other members of the department are truly without parallel.

One of the main advantages I’ve found at Cambridge is the collaborative nature that exists between labs and disciplines. The lines between psychology, psychiatry and neuroscience are blurred, and journal clubs, weekly seminars and visiting lecturers help bring the departments together, fostering the feeling of a wider scientific community and engendering discussion and collaboration. This cooperative environment helped encourage me to go beyond the original scope of my PhD and to set up an independent side project outside the immediate focus of my lab, which wouldn’t have been otherwise feasible.The thing that has always struck me most about Cambridge, though, is the passion that everyone brings to their work. Whether it’s seeking advice from professors in the department or chatting with your fellow graduate students at college, the enthusiasm with which everyone speaks about their research is infectious. The atmosphere is one of intellectual excitement and curiosity, and it is this aspect of Cambridge that I find most compelling and inspiring.

Dana Smith, PhD student in the Department, supported by the Cambridge Overseas Trust

FAQs

Find the answers to frequently asked questions.

MPhil in Social and Developmental Psychology (Course Code BLPCM2)

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The Master of Philosophy (MPhil) introduces students to a broad range of issues in social and developmental psychology and provides them with an opportunity to conduct a substantial piece of research. A core value of the course is that psychology should be theoretically rich with relevance to real world issues. As such, the lectures cover key concepts and perspectives at the heart of social and developmental psychology and apply them to contemporary social issues, such as parent-child relationships in diverse types of families and communities, psychological adjustment, sexuality, culture, religion, music, entrepreneurship, and forensic investigation.

Students attend lectures during the first and second terms. Social psychology lectures focus on fundamental concepts in social cognition, personality and individual differences, gender, and social representations. Developmental psychology lectures focus on child development and adjustment in changing family and social contexts, developmental psychopathology, children and the law, and gender development.

In the third term, students take no formal classes but focus on conducting and writing up their dissertation research.

Throughout the year, students are expected to attend the regular seminars hosted on alternate weeks by the Department and the Centre for Family Research. They are also encouraged to attend other lectures and seminars throughout the University.

The MPhil examination is based on three submitted essays, research methods assessments, and the production of a 15,000 word dissertation.

MPhil programme structure

Topics

• Individual differences
• Social cognition
• Close relationships in childhood and adulthood
• Gender and development
• Forensic child psychology
• Traditional and new family forms
• Social interaction and representation

Methods

• Interviewing techniques
• Assessing families
• Questionnaire and interview design
• Psychometric testing
• Longitudinal research methods
• Qualitative research methods

Social Science Research Methods (compulsory)

The Department of Psychology and other departments of the School of the Humanities and Social Sciences, together with the School of the Physical Sciences and Judge Business School, are participants in the Social Sciences Research Methods Centre (SSRMC). This provides our students with the opportunity to advance their understanding of many cutting-edge methodologies at the forefront of advances in social science. These include:
• qualitative methodologies
• structural equation modelling
• survey design
• path and time series analysis
• latent factor and latent class analysis
• exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis
• discourse analysis.

Assessment

Students are assessed on the basis of submitted coursework, research methods assessment, and a dissertation. The coursework consists of: a submitted research proposal, the critical appraisal of a topical research paper and an essay that addresses a philosophical or methodical issue in the field, and the completion of assessments in Psychometrics and other research methods modules. The dissertation should demonstrate mastery of a substantive topic in social or developmental psychology and of appropriate research methods, and include some element of original data collection.

Continuation into the PhD programme

Students can apply to continue on the PhD programme. The preparatory work for the PhD proposal should be done in consultation with a supervisor.

Eligibility and application

Applications for graduate study in the Department of Psychology are made through the University's Graduate Admissions. We recommend that potential applicants take the time to familiarise themselves with the useful material on their web pages.

Academic requirements

Graduate work in Cambridge is intense and very intellectually demanding and so the University has high academic entry requirements. You are normally expected to hold or to be about to achieve:
• at least a 2.I honours degree from a UK university
• an equivalent standard from an overseas university (On a 4-point GPA, we require a minimum of 3.5 out of 4)
• a fluent command of the English language
• completion of any current training or education course
You are not required to provide GRE scores.

Conversion courses

The MPhil in Social and Developmental Psychology is not a conversion course - applicants must have academic experience in the relevant field.

Progression from MPhil to PhD

Applicants applying for admission to the MPhil degree with the intention of continuing to the PhD upon completion should apply for admission to the one-year MPhil only in the first instance. It may be useful, if applicants are also applying for funding, to indicate any intention to continue to the PhD in a personal statement, or in their research proposal.

Deadlines

Applications must be received by the 28th April for candidates wishing to start in October.
If applicants wish to also apply for funding, applications must be sent earlier. Details are available on the funding pages of the Graduate Admissions website.

MPhil enquiries

Enquiries about the MPhil in Social and Developmental Psychology should be directed to Rita Day (Graduate Secretary).

FAQs

Find the answers to frequently asked questions.

Prospective MPhil SDP supervisors

Members of staff listed on this page are willing to consider supervising students on the MPhil in Social and Developmental Psychology. 

Detailed information about the research interests of academic staff can be found on their profile pages. To visit the profile page of a member of staff, click on their name.

Once you have identified a potential supervisor, you are strongly advised to send them a draft research proposal before making your application.

Image of Professor Simon Baron-Cohen

Professor Simon Baron-Cohen

Autism Spectrum Conditions.

Dr Juliet Foster

The development and interaction between different forms of knowledge; social psychological perspectives on mental ill health; theory of social representations.

Professor Susan Golombok

Parenting and child development, particularly in relation to non-traditional family forms.

Professor Melissa Hines

Human gender development.

Professor Claire Hughes

Child development; pre-school children and the transition to school.

Professor Michael Lamb

Developmental; forensic interviewing; parent-child relationships.

Dr Jochen Menges.png

Dr Jochen Menges

Leadership; affect in organisations; research methods.

Dr Kate Plaisted Grant

Perception; social cognition; attention; learning, memory and attentional processing in autism and normal development; autism; vision.

Dr Jason Rentfrow

Relationship between basic psychological characteristics and common social psychological processes; the expression of personality in different domains.

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Dr Andreas Richter

Creativity in teams; effective intergroup relations.

Dr Kai Ruggeri

Dr Kai Ruggeri

Professor John Rust

Pure and applied psychometrics; psychometric analysis of digital footprints in social media; Computer Adaptive Testing.

 Dr Simone Schnall

Relationship between cognitive and affective processes; embodied cognition; morality; social cognition.

Dr Dénes Szücs

Numerical development; working memory development; theories of visual working memory; EEG, ERP.

Dr Sander van der Linden

Dr Sander van der Linden

Social norms; altruism; environmental psychology; social decision-making; motivated cognition.

Application procedure

Application deadline

The University's final deadline for applications is 28th April. However, funding deadlines are much earlier and it is imperative that applicants consult the funding pages for further information.

Step 1 - Identify a potential supervisor/supervisors

Prospective PhD and MPhil students must identify a potential supervisor from our website*. Go to the Research page to browse our major research themes or view the Academic Staff page for information and contact details of individuals. Prospective Social and Developmental Psychology (SDP) MPhil students should browse our list of potential SDP MPhil supervisors.

You are expected to make email contact with those staff whose research is of interest to you in order to discuss research possibilities. Students wishing to be supervised by Professor Simon Baron-Cohen should apply for admission via the Department of Psychiatry.  When contacting a potential supervisor you are requested to state the degree for which you wish to be considered and provide the following:

  • curriculum vitae detailing your academic record
  • names of two academic referees (one of whom should have been your project supervisor)
  • brief details of your area of interest

Individual members of staff will be pleased to answer informal enquiries about specific research areas, and indeed candidates who are certain of their field of interest are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor at an early stage, to discover whether their research could be accommodated in the supervisor's laboratory. It is in the need for an early choice of supervisor that the Cambridge system most notably differs from a North American graduate school: candidates do not spend an extended period conducting research projects in different labs or taking courses in a large range of fields, but begin research work at once under the guidance of their supervisor, attending lectures devoted to their chosen field and to general principles of experimental design and analysis.

Please inform the Graduate Administrator, of whom you intend to contact and the outcome of your discussions. If you receive a positive response to your enquiry and you wish to be considered for funding then you must proceed to step 2 as quickly as possible.  Please note funding deadlines.

*Getting the support of a prospective supervisor is just the first step in the admissions process and does not automatically guarantee you a place on the course.

Step 2 - Submit a formal application

In order to submit your online application, the Graduate Admission and Scholarship Application Form (GRADSAF), you must consult the University's central Graduate Admissions pages. Here you will find all the information you need to submit the GRADSAF.

It is important that you advise the Department's when you have submitted your application.

Research proposal

All prospective graduate students are required to submit a research proposal as part of the application procedure. For information about the content and format of a research proposal, click here.

 


Funding

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The funding process

Securing funding to support graduate study is a separate (though related) procedure to the academic application. There are a number of funding opportunities available, but all are extremely competitive. It is not unusual for applicants who are made a conditional offer of a place to find themselves without the necessary funds to actually commence their study.

Please do be sure to read the following information most carefully.

Funding offered by the University

Cambridge Trusts

Cambridge International Scholarship Scheme (CISS)

Cambridge Home and EU Scholarship Scheme (CHESS)

UK Research Councils

In order to be considered for University funding, applicants must:

  • apply by the funding deadlines
  • tick the box on the application form relating to the funding for which they would like to be considered
  • submit a curriculum vitae
  • submit a personal reference (Gates Scholarship applicants only)

For more information about University funding, applicants should consult the funding pages of the Student Registry website.

Other funding

To find out about other funding schemes for which you may be eligible, see the Cambridge Funding Search.

 

College funding

A number of Colleges offer generous scholarships for graduate students, but they are also very competitive. It is not recommended that you choose a College based solely on the possibility of funding.

Clare College

Fitzwilliam College

Girton College

Homerton College

Jesus College

Magdalene College

Murray Edwards College (New Hall)

Pembroke College

Sidney Sussex College

St Catharine's College

Trinity Hall

Cambridge University Graduate Admissions

University information for prospective postgraduate students

The link address is: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/

Graduate training programme

Link to current graduate training programme

The link address is: http://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/currentpg

Other relevant departments

Please contact the following Departments directly if you are interested in their particular areas of research:

Research in neuropsychiatry (e.g., depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and drug addiction) is carried out in the Department of Psychiatry and within the Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute.

Research in several areas of human experimental and applied psychology is also carried out at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.

Research on ethology and on social aspects of developmental psychology is carried out at the Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour.

Students interested in social or organizational psychology, in personality, or in social aspects of clinical psychology are advised to contact the Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Sciences.

Research proposal

Your research proposal is your opportunity to show your prospective supervisor that you have interesting ideas, and that you have some idea of how to test them.

It should consist of about two sides of A4, including references and it should include:

  • clear empirical objective
  • some idea of the research methods you would use
  • some theoretical background

Firstly you need to lay out the theoretical background to your research question, and then provide a rationale for testing a hypothesis or two. You should briefly outline your methods, your sample, and the various techniques you hope to use. Finally give a brief statement of how the data will be analysed, and outline what various findings might lead to.

Frequently asked questions

Approaching graduate study can be daunting. Here is a selection of frequently asked questions, which should help you plan your application and your study.

Should I get in contact with a potential supervisor before I submit my application?

Yes. Prospective PhD and MPhil students must identify a potential supervisor from the Department's website. Go to the Research page to browse our major research themes or view the Academic Staff page for information and contact details of individuals. Prospective Social and Developmental Psychology (SDP) MPhil students should browse our list of potential SDP MPhil supervisors.

If my prospective supervisor tells me that they would like to work with me and encourages me to make an application, does this mean that I will automatically get a place on the course?

No. All applications are considered by the Admissions panel of the Graduate Education Committee, who rank the applications and nominate the strongest ones for funding. Supervisors have only a limited number of places each year, and these will be offered to the strongest applicants.

What if my first language is not English?

You must pass an English test in order to be eligible. This is to ensure that you have the skills to succeed in your course. Specific details are available from the Graduate Admissions website.

How long will it take before I hear about the outcome of my application?

There is a significant amount of processing that has to take place before a decision about eligibility can be made. Graduate Admissions receives applications in the first instance, logs the application details, and forwards them to the Department. The Department must similarly receive and log the application details before applications can be academically assessed. The Graduate Secretary will send an email notification to all applicants to let them know that their application has reached the Department.

Following assessment, a recommendation will then be made by the Department, and forwarded back to Graduate Admissions. Final checks and assessments must be made before Graduate Admissions can send letters of offer. We recommend, therefore, that you allow two months for the assessment of your application.

Is there a danger that I won't be accepted at a college?

No. It is possible that the colleges that you list as preferences will not have any available places, however, there are plenty of places across the 31 colleges for all successful applicants.

How many available places are there on each programme?

There are no definite quotas, but we aim to admit 30 MPhil students, and 30 PhD students each year.

Can I defer admission if I can't take up my place in the year that I apply?

No, unfortunately not. The University does not offer a deferment option. If you wish to be considered for admission in a future academic year, you must lodge another application, but it will not be necessary to send all documentation a second time, as Graduate Admissions keeps all applications on file for a given period of time.

Do I need to provide GRE test results or other test results?

No. The only additional materials required are a research proposal, two academic references (a further reference if you would like to be considered for funding), and transcripts. And if your first language is not English, you need to provide IELTS or TOEFL scores.

Do you offer a conversion course?

No. You must have an academic background in Psychology.

Is the MPhil in Social and Developmental Psychology accredited by the British Psychological Society?

No.

Do I have to apply through the Board of Graduate Studies?

Yes. Informal applications directly to the Department are not possible.

Can I start the MPhil in Social and Developmental Psychology in January or April?

No. The course begins in October and takes nine months.

Can I defer entry to the PhD/MPhil in Biological Sciences by Research to Lent or Easter terms?

Yes, if there are good grounds to do this – some funding agencies don’t make their awards until after 31st July for example, or academic transcripts might be available too late for conditions of an offer to be met in time. If you think that you might need to do this, please contact the Graduate Administrator to discuss your circumstances.

Can I apply to start the PhD/MPhil in Biological Sciences in January or April rather than October?

This is not generally encouraged as it excludes applicants  for competing for funding and attending the induction events at the beginning of the academic year.

However, in extreme circumstances, the Department may be willing to consider such applications. Please contact the Graduate Administrator IN ADVANCE of submitting your application to discuss your options.

 

 

UK Research Councils

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council Doctoral Training Programme (BBSRC DTP)

The University of Cambridge is offering up to 30 four-year BBSRC-funded studentships each year, with an application deadline of 1 December. A wide range of projects is available in the Department of Psychology and across many other world-class departments and research institutes under the four broad themes of Bioscience for Health; Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy; Agriculture and Food Security; and World Class Underpinning Bioscience.

The Programme is a partnership between 15 Departments and Institutes at the University of Cambridge and five research organisations (University Partner Institutions) situated nearby.

UK and EU students who meet the UK residency requirements will be eligible for a full studentship. Students from EU countries who do not meet the residency requirements may still be eligible for a fees-only award. Further information about eligibility for BBSRC funding can be found at the BBSRC website.

Full details of the structure and organization of this programme are available on the BBSRC DTP website

Please note that to apply for BBSRC DTP funding, applicants must apply directly to Plant Sciences by the deadline of 1 December, rather than the Department of Psychology. Following the first year of the Programme, students can transfer to the Department of their choice to complete their PhD. Details of how to apply can be found on the BBSRC DTP website.

 

Medical Research Council Doctoral Training Partnership (MRC DTP)

The Cambridge MRC Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) is a partnership between the University of Cambridge and the Babraham Institute, and includes as associate partners the MRC Institutes and Units in Cambridge, and other University Partner Institutes. Fully-funded PhD studentships are available each year, with an application deadline of 1 December.  Projects in the Department of Psychology are available under the Neuroscience and Mental Health theme in particular.

UK and EU students who meet the UK residency requirements will be eligible for a full studentship. Students from EU countries who do not meet the residency requirements may still be eligible for a fees-only award. Eligible applicants are automatically considered for any available studentships.

Full details of the Cambridge MRC DTP can be foudn at http://mrcdtp.medschl.cam.ac.uk

 

Economic and Social Research Council Doctoral Training Centre (ESRC DTC) 

The University awards 33 ESRC studentships every year to outstanding candidates resident in the UK or EEA and working in the social sciences, with an application deadline of 4 January.

UK and EU students who meet the UK residency requirements will be eligible for a full studentship. Students from EU countries who do not meet the residency requirements may still be eligible for a fees-only award. Further information about eligibility for ESRC funding can be found at http://www.esrc.ac.uk/

Full details of the Cambridge ESRC DTC can be found at http://esrc-dtc.cshss.cam.ac.uk

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